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Volume 54(3); May 2021
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Commentarys
Musculoskeletal Pains and Their Risk Factors in Endoscopists
Gi-young Park
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):295-296.   Published online May 24, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.132
PDFPubReaderePub

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  • The Relationship Between Colonoscopy Practice Style, Operator Ergonomics and Procedure Quality
    Evren Besler, Mustafa F Celayir, Emre Teke, Cebrail Akyuz, Süleyman Toker
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • GIE Editorial Board Top 10: advances in GI endoscopy in 2021
    Emad Qayed, Tiffany Y. Chua, Ramzi Mulki, Dennis Yang, Priya A. Jamidar, Ajaypal Singh, Felix W. Leung, Jessica X. Yu, Jenifer R. Lightdale
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2022; 96(6): 1062.     CrossRef
  • 2,504 View
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Big Issues on Small Polyps: An Ideal Device, But Is It for an Ideal Indication?
Yoji Takeuchi
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):297-298.   Published online May 24, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.112
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  • 2,679 View
  • 91 Download
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Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration for Focal Liver Lesions: The Expanding Light Over the Shadow
Takuji Iwashita, Masahito Shimizu
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):299-300.   Published online May 20, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.120
PDFPubReaderePub

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  • An artificial intelligence algorithm is highly accurate for detecting endoscopic features of eosinophilic esophagitis
    Christoph Römmele, Robert Mendel, Caroline Barrett, Hans Kiesl, David Rauber, Tobias Rückert, Lisa Kraus, Jakob Heinkele, Christine Dhillon, Bianca Grosser, Friederike Prinz, Julia Wanzl, Carola Fleischmann, Sandra Nagl, Elisabeth Schnoy, Jakob Schlottman
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • 3,001 View
  • 94 Download
  • 1 Crossref
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Focused Review Series: Recent Updates on the Role of EUSs in Pancreatobiliary Disease
What You Need to Know Before Performing Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Hepaticogastrostomy
Tanyaporn Chantarojanasiri, Thawee Ratanachu-Ek, Nonthalee Pausawasdi
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):301-308.   Published online May 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.103
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the primary treatment modality for bile duct obstruction. When ERCP is unsuccessful, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage can be an alternative method. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has emerged as a treatment option for biliary obstruction, especially after ERCP failure. EUS-BD offers transluminal intrahepatic and extrahepatic drainage through a transgastric and transduodenal approach. EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS) is an excellent choice for patients with hilar strictures or those with a surgically altered anatomy. The optimal steps in EUS-HGS are case selection, bile duct visualization, puncture-site selection, wire insertion and manipulation, tract dilation, and stent placement. Caution should be taken at each step to prevent complications. Dedicated devices for EUS-HGS have been developed to improve the technical success rate and reduce complications. This technical review focuses on the essential practical points at each step of EUS-HGS.

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  • Use of a novel screw-type dilator for endoscopic ultrasonography-guided hepaticogastrostomy via 22-gauge needle and 0.018-inch guidewire.
    Shin Kato, Mariko Tsukamoto, Taichi Murai, Yuta Koike
    Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Transbulbäre und transgastrale Gallengangsdrainage
    Philipp Thies, Markus Dollhopf
    Gastroenterologie up2date.2024; 20(01): 69.     CrossRef
  • Safety of endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy in patients with malignant biliary obstruction and ascites
    Tsukasa Yasuda, Kazuo Hara, Nobumasa Mizuno, Shin Haba, Takamichi Kuwahara, Nozomi Okuno, Yasuhiro Kuraishi, Takafumi Yanaidani, Sho Ishikawa, Masanori Yamada, Toshitaka Fukui
    Clinical Endoscopy.2024; 57(2): 246.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for recurrent stenosis after balloon dilation for benign hepaticojejunostomy anastomotic stricture
    Takafumi Mie, Takashi Sasaki, Takeshi Okamoto, Tsuyoshi Takeda, Chinatsu Mori, Yuto Yamada, Takaaki Furukawa, Akiyoshi Kasuga, Masato Matsuyama, Masato Ozaka, Naoki Sasahira
    Clinical Endoscopy.2024; 57(2): 253.     CrossRef
  • Is Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Hepaticogastrostomy Safe and Effective after Failed Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography?—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Saqr Alsakarneh, Mahmoud Y. Madi, Dushyant Singh Dahiya, Fouad Jaber, Yassine Kilani, Mohamed Ahmed, Azizullah Beran, Mohamed Abdallah, Omar Al Ta’ani, Anika Mittal, Laith Numan, Hemant Goyal, Mohammad Bilal, Wissam Kiwan
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2024; 13(13): 3883.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic ultrasound-guided intervention for inaccessible papilla in advanced malignant hilar biliary obstruction
    Partha Pal, Sundeep Lakhtakia
    Clinical Endoscopy.2023; 56(2): 143.     CrossRef
  • Liver impaction technique improves technical success rate of guidewire insertion during EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (with video)
    Junichi Nakamura, Takeshi Ogura, Saori Ueno, Atsushi Okuda, Nobu Nishioka, Yuki Uba, Mitsuki Tomita, Kimi Bessho, Nobuhiro Hattori, Hiroki Nishikawa
    Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Technical Review
    Roy L. J. van Wanrooij, Michiel Bronswijk, Rastislav Kunda, Simon M. Everett, Sundeep Lakhtakia, Mihai Rimbas, Tomas Hucl, Abdenor Badaoui, Ryan Law, Paolo Giorgio Arcidiacono, Alberto Larghi, Marc Giovannini, Mouen A. Khashab, Kenneth F. Binmoeller, Marc
    Endoscopy.2022; 54(03): 310.     CrossRef
  • Practical Tips for Safe and Successful Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Hepaticogastrostomy: A State-of-the-Art Technical Review
    Saburo Matsubara, Keito Nakagawa, Kentaro Suda, Takeshi Otsuka, Masashi Oka, Sumiko Nagoshi
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(6): 1591.     CrossRef
  • Prevention of Serious Complications during Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biliary Drainage: A Case-Based Technical Review
    Surinder Singh Rana, Jimil Shah, Harish Bhujade, Ujjwal Gorsi, Mandeep Kang, Rajesh Gupta
    Journal of Digestive Endoscopy.2022; 13(02): 082.     CrossRef
  • 5,256 View
  • 217 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
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Contrast Harmonic Endoscopic Ultrasound in Pancreatic Diseases
Rafael Mejuto-Fernandez, Julio Iglesias-Garcia
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):309-313.   Published online June 18, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.048
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was first described in 1986, with the aim of overcoming the problems affecting transabdominal ultrasound imaging, mainly problems related to the interposition of gas, and artifacts produced by bone or fat. Now, EUS can be considered as the best method for the analysis of pancreatic diseases, overtaking the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, fundamental B-mode imaging is limited for the diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions, because most of them are depicted as heterogeneous and hypo-echoic, and it is difficult to differentiate between benign and malignant lesions. Similar to how perfusion patterns obtained by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging after injection of contrast agents allow for the characterization of focal lesions, EUS has also recently been introduced to the use of contrast agents for performing contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CEH-EUS), which has the capability to distinguish the type of perfusion between lesions and surrounding tissue. CEH-EUS has shown its usefulness for the diagnosis and characterization of solid pancreatic lesions. Moreover, CEH-EUS is also highly accurate for distinguishing non-neoplastic from neoplastic cysts in pancreatic lesions. Another potential role of CEH-EUS is its ability to direct EUS-guided tissue acquisition.

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  • Endoscopic ultrasonography: Enhancing diagnostic accuracy
    Julio Iglesias-Garcia, Jose Lariño-Noia, Daniel de la Iglesia-García, J. Enrique Dominguez-Muñoz
    Best Practice & Research Clinical Gastroenterology.2022; 60-61: 101808.     CrossRef
  • 4,808 View
  • 179 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
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Endoscopic Ultrasound–Guided Fiducial Placement for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Pancreatic Malignancy
Seong-Hun Kim, Eun Ji Shin
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):314-323.   Published online May 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.102
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an important treatment option for pancreatic cancer, which is known to be one of the malignancies with the worst prognosis. However, the high radiation doses delivered during SBRT may cause damage to adjacent radiosensitive organs. To minimize such damage, fiducial markers are used for localization during SBRT for pancreatic cancer. The development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has enabled fiducial markers to be inserted into the pancreas using an EUS fine-needle aspiration (FNA) needle, unlike in the past when percutaneous placement was generally performed. For successful EUS-guided fiducial marker placement, it is necessary for the fiducial markers to be loaded within the EUS-FNA needles to have a low probability of complications and a low migration risk, and to be stably observed in SBRT imaging. A systematic review has shown that the technical success rate of EUS-guided fiducial marker placement is 96.27%, whereas the fiducial marker migration and adverse event rates are 4.33% and 4.85%, respectively. Nonetheless, standardized techniques for fiducial marker placement and the characteristics of optimal fiducial markers have not yet been established. This review will introduce the characteristics (e.g., materials and shapes) of fiducial markers used in fiducial marker placement for pancreatic cancer and will discuss conventional techniques along with their success rates, difficulties, and adverse events.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • EUS-guided interventional therapies for pancreatic diseases
    Rongmin Xu, Kai Zhang, Nan Ge, Siyu Sun
    Frontiers in Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cardiac migration of an implanted hepatic fiducial marker used for stereotactic body radiation therapy - A case report
    Youstina Soliman, Febin Antony, Mark Vivian, Sankar Venkatraman, Maged Nashed
    Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development of devices for interventional endoscopic ultrasound for the management of pancreatobiliary diseases
    Masahiro Itonaga, Masayuki Kitano, Reiko Ashida
    Digestive Endoscopy.2023; 35(3): 302.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fiducial Placement for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer
    Irina M. Cazacu, Ben S. Singh, Rachael M. Martin-Paulpeter, Sam Beddar, Stephen Chun, Emma B. Holliday, Albert C. Koong, Prajnan Das, Eugene J. Koay, Cullen Taniguchi, Joseph M. Herman, Manoop S. Bhutani
    Cancers.2023; 15(22): 5355.     CrossRef
  • A Preliminary Controlled Trial of Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fiducial Markers to Guide Pancreas Surgery
    Patrick W. Chang, Jonathan Sadik, Ara B. Sahakian, Ravi Kankotia, Christopher Ko, Jessica Serna, Alex Rodriguez, Helen Lee, Sujit Kulkarni, Yuri Genyk, Mohd Sheikh, James L. Buxbaum
    Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Management of Pancreatobiliary Malignancies
    Dong Wook Lee, Eun Young Kim
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences.2022; 67(5): 1635.     CrossRef
  • Hot topics in therapeutic EUS
    Daniela Tabacelia, Alexandru Martiniuc, DanielaElena Burtea, Adrian Saftoiu, Cezar Stroescu
    Endoscopic Ultrasound.2022; 11(3): 153.     CrossRef
  • 4,481 View
  • 193 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
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Reviews
Diagnosing Gastric Mesenchymal Tumors by Digital Endoscopic Ultrasonography Image Analysis
Moon Won Lee, Gwang Ha Kim
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):324-328.   Published online June 18, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.061
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Gastric mesenchymal tumors (GMTs) are incidentally discovered in national gastric screening programs in Korea. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most useful diagnostic modality for evaluating GMTs. The differentiation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors from benign mesenchymal tumors, such as schwannomas or leiomyomas, is important to ensure appropriate clinical management. However, this is difficult and operator dependent because of the subjective interpretation of EUS images. Digital image analysis computes the distribution and spatial variation of pixels using texture analysis to extract useful data, enabling the objective analysis of EUS images and decreasing interobserver and intraobserver agreement in EUS image interpretation. This review aimed to summarize the usefulness and future of digital EUS image analysis for GMTs based on published reports and our experience.

Citations

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  • Schwannoma gástrico. Reporte de un caso
    Darío Montes N, Nixon Cevallos R, Rubén Montes N
    Oncología (Ecuador).2024; 34(1): 52.     CrossRef
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    Dong Chan Joo, Gwang Ha Kim, Moon Won Lee, Bong Eun Lee, Ji Woo Kim, Kwang Baek Kim
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2024; 13(13): 3725.     CrossRef
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    Xian‐Da Zhang, Ling Zhang, Ting‐Ting Gong, Zhuo‐Ran Wang, Kang‐Li Guo, Jun Li, Yuan Chen, Jian‐Tao Zhang, Ben‐Gong Ye, Jin Ding, Jian‐Wei Zhu, Feng Liu, Duan‐Min Hu, JianGang Chen, Chun‐Hua Zhou, Duo‐Wu Zou
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    Gwang Ha Kim, Dong Chan Joo, Moon Won Lee, Bong Eun Lee, Kyungbin Kim
    The Ewha Medical Journal.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Osamu Goto, Mitsuru Kaise, Katsuhiko Iwakiri
    Gut and Liver.2022; 16(3): 321.     CrossRef
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    M. Reyes Busta Nistal, Noelia Alcaide Suarez, Luis Fernández Salazar, Daniel Corrales Cruz
    Gastroenterología y Hepatología.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Shotaro Okanoue, Masaya Iwamuro, Takehiro Tanaka, Takuya Satomi, Kenta Hamada, Hiroyuki Sakae, Makoto Abe, Yoshiyasu Kono, Hiromitsu Kanzaki, Seiji Kawano, Yoshiro Kawahara, Hiroyuki Okada
    Medicine.2021; 100(40): e27520.     CrossRef
  • 5,496 View
  • 218 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
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Artificial Intelligence in Lower Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: The Current Status and Future Perspective
Sebastian Manuel Milluzzo, Paola Cesaro, Leonardo Minelli Grazioli, Nicola Olivari, Cristiano Spada
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):329-339.   Published online January 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.082
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
The present manuscript aims to review the history, recent advances, evidence, and challenges of artificial intelligence (AI) in colonoscopy. Although it is mainly focused on polyp detection and characterization, it also considers other potential applications (i.e., inflammatory bowel disease) and future perspectives. Some of the most recent algorithms show promising results that are similar to human expert performance. The integration of AI in routine clinical practice will be challenging, with significant issues to overcome (i.e., regulatory, reimbursement). Medico-legal issues will also need to be addressed. With the exception of an AI system that is already available in selected countries (GI Genius; Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA), the majority of the technology is still in its infancy and has not yet been proven to reach a sufficient diagnostic performance to be adopted in the clinical practice. However, larger players will enter the arena of AI in the next few months.

Citations

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    Lawrence Hookey
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2024; 99(1): 100.     CrossRef
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    Sanjay R.V. Gadi, Sriya S. Muralidharan, Jeremy R. Glissen Brown
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    Alberto Savino, Emanuele Rondonotti, Simone Rocchetto, Alessandra Piagnani, Niccolò Bina, Pasquale Di Domenico, Francesco Segatta, Franco Radaelli
    Expert Review of Medical Devices.2024; 21(5): 359.     CrossRef
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    Frederick H. Koh, Jasmine Ladlad, Fung-Joon Foo, Winson J. Tan, Sharmini S. Sivarajah, Leonard M. L. Ho, Jia-Lin Ng, Frederick H. Koh, Cheryl Chong, Darius Aw, Juinn-Haur Kam, Alvin Y. H. Tan, Choon-Chieh Tan, Baldwin P. M. Yeung, Wai-Keong Wong, Bin-Chet
    Surgical Endoscopy.2023; 37(1): 165.     CrossRef
  • Systematic meta-analysis of computer-aided detection to detect early esophageal cancer using hyperspectral imaging
    Wei-Chih Liao, Arvind Mukundan, Cleorita Sadiaza, Yu-Ming Tsao, Chien-Wei Huang, Hsiang-Chen Wang
    Biomedical Optics Express.2023; 14(8): 4383.     CrossRef
  • Detecting colorectal lesions with image-enhanced endoscopy: an updated review from clinical trials
    Mizuki Nagai, Sho Suzuki, Yohei Minato, Fumiaki Ishibashi, Kentaro Mochida, Ken Ohata, Tetsuo Morishita
    Clinical Endoscopy.2023; 56(5): 553.     CrossRef
  • Accuracy of polyp characterization by artificial intelligence and endoscopists: a prospective, non-randomized study in a tertiary endoscopy center
    Sebastian Baumer, Kilian Streicher, Saleh A. Alqahtani, Dominic Brookman-Amissah, Monika Brunner, Christoph Federle, Klaus Muehlenberg, Lukas Pfeifer, Andrea Salzberger, Wolfgang Schorr, Jozef Zustin, Oliver Pech
    Endoscopy International Open.2023; 11(09): E818.     CrossRef
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    Donghwan Kim, Eunsun Kim
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2023; 66(11): 658.     CrossRef
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    Uday C. Ghoshal, Saikat Chakrabarti, Mahesh K. Goenka
    Journal of Digestive Endoscopy.2023; 14(04): 239.     CrossRef
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    Carolin Zippelius, Saleh A. Alqahtani, Jörg Schedel, Dominic Brookman-Amissah, Klaus Muehlenberg, Christoph Federle, Andrea Salzberger, Wolfgang Schorr, Oliver Pech
    Endoscopy.2022; 54(05): 465.     CrossRef
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    Yuan-Yen Chang, Pai-Chi Li, Ruey-Feng Chang, Yu-Yao Chang, Siou-Ping Huang, Yang-Yuan Chen, Wen-Yen Chang, Hsu-Heng Yen
    Surgical Endoscopy.2022; 36(9): 6446.     CrossRef
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    Eyal Klang, Shelly Soffer, Abraham Tsur, Eyal Shachar, Adi Lahat
    Biomimetics.2022; 7(1): 33.     CrossRef
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    Suliman Mohamed Fati, Ebrahim Mohammed Senan, Ahmad Taher Azar
    Sensors.2022; 22(11): 4079.     CrossRef
  • No-Code Platform-Based Deep-Learning Models for Prediction of Colorectal Polyp Histology from White-Light Endoscopy Images: Development and Performance Verification
    Eun Jeong Gong, Chang Seok Bang, Jae Jun Lee, Seung In Seo, Young Joo Yang, Gwang Ho Baik, Jong Wook Kim
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2022; 12(6): 963.     CrossRef
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    Eun Jeong Gong, Chang Seok Bang, Jae Jun Lee, Young Joo Yang, Gwang Ho Baik
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2022; 12(9): 1361.     CrossRef
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    Chang Bong Yang, Sang Hoon Kim, Yun Jeong Lim
    Clinical Endoscopy.2022; 55(5): 594.     CrossRef
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    Naoki Muguruma, Tetsuji Takayama
    Clinical Endoscopy.2022; 55(1): 45.     CrossRef
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    Antonino Guerrisi, Italia Falcone, Fabio Valenti, Marco Rao, Enzo Gallo, Sara Ungania, Maria Teresa Maccallini, Maurizio Fanciulli, Pasquale Frascione, Aldo Morrone, Mauro Caterino
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    Pablo Cortegoso Valdivia, Alfonso Elosua, Charles Houdeville, Marco Pennazio, Ignacio Fernández-Urién, Xavier Dray, Ervin Toth, Rami Eliakim, Anastasios Koulaouzidis
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    Wonshik Kim, Beomjae Lee, Ahyoung Yoo, Seunghan Kim, Moonkyung Joo, Jong-Jae Park
    Diagnostics.2021; 11(11): 2123.     CrossRef
  • 5,279 View
  • 254 Download
  • 20 Web of Science
  • 20 Crossref
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Original Articles
Safety and Recipient Satisfaction of Propofol Sedation in Outpatient Endoscopy: A 24-Hour Prospective Investigation Using a Questionnaire Survey
Yoshihide Kanno, Tetsuya Ohira, Yoshihiro Harada, Shinsuke Koshita, Takahisa Ogawa, Hiroaki Kusunose, Yoshiki Koike, Taku Yamagata, Toshitaka Sakai, Kaori Masu, Keisuke Yonamine, Kazuaki Miyamoto, Megumi Tanaka, Tomohiro Shimada, Fumisato Kozakai, Kazuki Endo, Haruka Okano, Daichi Komabayashi, Takeshi Shimizu, Shohei Suzuki, Kei Ito
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):340-347.   Published online December 11, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.138
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of sedation with propofol as an alternative to benzodiazepine drugs in outpatient endoscopy.
Methods
In this prospective study, examinees who underwent outpatient endoscopy under propofol sedation and submitted a nextday questionnaire with providing informed consent were evaluated. Periprocedural acute responses, late adverse events within 24 hours, and examinee satisfaction were evaluated.
Results
Among the 4,122 patients who received propofol in the 17,978 outpatient-based endoscopic examinations performed between November 2016 and March 2018, 2,305 eligible examinees (esophagogastroduodenoscopy for 1,340, endoscopic ultrasonography for 945, and total colonoscopy for 20) were enrolled, and their responses to a questionnaire were analyzed. The mean propofol dose was 69.6±24.4 mg (range, 20–200 mg). Diazepam, midazolam, and/or pentazocine in combination with propofol was administered to 146 examinees. Mild oxygen desaturation was observed in 59 examinees (2.6%); and mild bradycardia, in 2 (0.09%). Other severe reactions or late events did not occur. After eliminating 181 invalid responses, 97.7% (2,065/2,124) of the patients desired propofol sedation in future examinations.
Conclusions
Propofol sedation was found to be safe—without severe adverse events or accidents—for outpatient endoscopy on the basis of the patients’ next-day self-evaluation. Given the high satisfaction level, propofol sedation might be an ideal tool for painless endoscopic screening.

Citations

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  • How to implement adverse events as a quality indicator in gastrointestinal endoscopy
    Tom G. Moreels
    Digestive Endoscopy.2024; 36(1): 89.     CrossRef
  • Propofol Alone versus Propofol in Combination with Midazolam for Sedative Endoscopy in Patients with Paradoxical Reactions to Midazolam
    Ji Hyung Nam, Dong Kee Jang, Jun Kyu Lee, Hyoun Woo Kang, Byung-Wook Kim, Byung Ik Jang
    Clinical Endoscopy.2022; 55(2): 234.     CrossRef
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    Jun Kyu Lee
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(11): 735.     CrossRef
  • 4,105 View
  • 125 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
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Clinical Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Practices during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic in Indonesia: An Online Nationwide Survey
Ahmad Fariz Malvi Zamzam Zein, Rabbinu Rangga Pribadi, Uswatun Khasanah, Muhammad Begawan Bestari, Ari Fahrial Syam
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):348-355.   Published online February 18, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.216
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has necessitated modifications to allow the safe practice of clinical gastroenterology and gastrointestinal endoscopy. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of clinical gastroenterology and gastrointestinal endoscopy practices during the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia.
Methods
This cross-sectional study enrolled physician members of the Indonesian Society for Digestive Endoscopy. We used an online self-administered questionnaire disseminated via social media. The 32-item survey determined the baseline characteristics of the participants, characteristics of clinical gastroenterology and gastrointestinal endoscopy practices, involvement of the physicians in the management of COVID-19, and overall impact of the pandemic on practice. All collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.
Results
The 200 participants in this study had a median age of 50 (34–76) years. Modifications in clinical gastroenterology practice were frequently reported in the outpatient (95.5%) and inpatient (100%) settings. All participants reported changes in the gastrointestinal endoscopy practice patterns. Of the participants, 86.0% were working in high-risk zones, and several of them reported inadequate protective personal equipment (34.0%). The median overall impact score of the pandemic on practice was 9 (2–10).
Conclusions
Physicians practicing clinical gastroenterology and gastrointestinal endoscopy in Indonesia work in high-risk settings. Modifications in clinical gastroenterology and gastrointestinal endoscopy practices are prevalent during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Citations

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  • Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on digestive endoscopists: an Ibero-American study
    Robin German Prieto-Ortiz, Camilo de Jesús Blanco-Avellaneda, Ricardo Cepeda-Vásquez, Diana Yanira Chimbi Rojas, Jhon Edison Prieto-Ortiz, Leticia Moreira-Ruiz, Lázaro Antonio Arango-Molano
    Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Rabbinu Rangga Pribadi, Amanda Pitarini Utari, Virly Nanda Muzellina, Saskia Aziza Nursyirwan, Hasan Maulahela, Kaka Renaldi, Ari Fahrial Syam
    Clinical Endoscopy.2022; 55(1): 156.     CrossRef
  • 4,078 View
  • 102 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
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Ergonomic Injuries in Endoscopists and Their Risk Factors
Lubna Kamani, Hamid Kalwar
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):356-362.   Published online March 3, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.200
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Prolonged repetitive strain caused by the continuous performance of complex endoscopic procedures enhances the risk of ergonomic injuries among health-care providers (HCPs), specifically endoscopists. This study aimed to assess the risk factors of ergonomic injuries among endoscopists and non-endoscopists.
Methods
This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Gastroenterology Department of Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 92 HCPs were enrolled, of whom 61 were involved in endoscopic procedures and 31 were non-endoscopists. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire during national gastroenterology conferences and analyzed using SPSS version 22 (IBM Corp. Chicago, IL, USA).
Results
Of the total study population, 95.08% of endoscopists were observed to have ergonomic injuries, whereas only 54.83% of non-endoscopists had ergonomic injuries (p<0.00). The most common injury associated with musculoskeletal (MSK) pain sites was back (41%), leg (23%), and hand (19.7%) pain among endoscopists. Of 28 endoscopists performing ≥20 procedures/week, 26 had MSK injury. However, 95.08% of endoscopists had developed MSK injury irrespective of working hours (>5 or <5 hr/wk).
Conclusions
Endoscopists are at high risk of developing ergonomic injuries, representing the negative potential of the endoscopy-associated workload. To overcome these issues, an appropriate strategic framework needs to be designed to avoid occupational compromises.

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    Nikko Gimpaya, William T. Tran, Samir C. Grover
    Current Opinion in Gastroenterology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Veronica Bessone, Daniel B. Roppenecker, Sven Adamsen
    Healthcare.2024; 12(9): 885.     CrossRef
  • Musculoskeletal injury and ergonomics in pediatric gastrointestinal endoscopic practice
    Wenly Ruan, Catharine M. Walsh, Swati Pawa, Sharlene L. D’Souza, Promila Banerjee, Shivangi Kothari, Graham A. McCreath, Douglas S. Fishman
    Surgical Endoscopy.2023; 37(1): 248.     CrossRef
  • Enhancing Ergonomics in Pediatric Endoscopy Training and Practice
    Catharine M. Walsh
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America.2023; 33(2): 235.     CrossRef
  • Musculoskeletal Injuries in the Endoscopy Practitioner Risk Factors, Ergonomic Challenges and Prevention—Narrative Review and Perspectives
    Tadej Durič, Ivana Cibulková, Jan Hajer
    Gastroenterology Insights.2023; 14(3): 352.     CrossRef
  • American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy guideline on the role of ergonomics for prevention of endoscopy-related injury: methodology and review of evidence
    Swati Pawa, Richard S. Kwon, Douglas S. Fishman, Nirav C. Thosani, Amandeep Shergill, Samir C. Grover, Mohammad Al-Haddad, Stuart K. Amateau, James L. Buxbaum, Audrey H. Calderwood, Jean M. Chalhoub, Nayantara Coelho-Prabhu, Madhav Desai, Sherif E. Elhana
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2023; 98(4): 492.     CrossRef
  • Protecting Gastroenterologists through Rehabilitation Training: An Overlooked Area of Concern
    Sun-Hye Ko, Myong Ki Baeg
    Gut and Liver.2023; 17(6): 829.     CrossRef
  • Ergonomía en endoscopia digestiva: prevalencia, tipos de trastornos musculoesqueléticos y factores de riesgo en endoscopistas de Colombia
    Camilo de Jesús Blanco Avellaneda, Robin German Prieto Ortiz, Ricardo Aníbal Cepeda Vásquez, Jose Bareño Silva, Carlos Arturo Gonzalez Salazar, Lázaro Antonio Arango Molano, Nairo Javier Senejoa Nuñez
    Revista colombiana de Gastroenterología.2022; 37(2): 174.     CrossRef
  • Gesundheitszustand des Endoskopiepersonals in Österreich
    Gerlinde Weilguny-Schöfl, Werner Dolak, Martina Fellinghauer, Theresia Schober, Rainer Schöfl
    Zeitschrift für Gastroenterologie.2022; 60(11): 1625.     CrossRef
  • Musculoskeletal Pains and Their Risk Factors in Endoscopists
    Gi-young Park
    Clinical Endoscopy.2021; 54(3): 295.     CrossRef
  • 3,510 View
  • 143 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
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Reduced Intravenous Fluorescein Dose for Upper and Lower Gastrointestinal Tract Probe-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy
Kazuya Inoki, Seiichiro Abe, Yusaku Tanaka, Koji Yamamoto, Daisuke Hihara, Ryoji Ichijima, Yukihiro Nakatani, HsinYu Chen, Hiroyuki Takamaru, Masau Sekiguchi, Masayoshi Yamada, Taku Sakamoto, Satoru Nonaka, Haruhisa Suzuki, Shigetaka Yoshinaga, Ichiro Oda, Takahisa Matsuda, Yutaka Saito
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):363-370.   Published online September 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.058
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) requires the administration of intravenous (IV) fluorescein. This study aimed to determine the optimal dose of IV fluorescein for both upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract pCLE.
Methods
Patients 20 to 79 years old with gastric high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or colorectal neoplasms (CRNs) were enrolled in the study. The dose de-escalation method was employed with five levels. The primary endpoint of the study was the determination of the optimal dose of IV fluorescein for pCLE of the GI tract. The reduced dose was determined based on off-line reviews by three endoscopists. An insufficient dose of fluorescein was defined as the dose of fluorescein with which the pCLE images were not deemed to be visible. If all three endoscopists determined that the tissue structure was visible, the doses were de-escalated.
Results
A total of 12 patients with gastric HGD and 12 patients with CRNs were enrolled in the study. Doses were de-escalated to 0.5 mg/kg of fluorescein for both non-neoplastic duodenal and colorectal mucosa. All gastric HGD or CRNs were visible with pCLE with IV fluorescein at 0.5 mg/kg.
Conclusions
In the present study, pCLE with IV fluorescein 0.5 mg/kg was adequate to visualize the magnified structure of both the upper and lower GI tract.

Citations

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  • Precision endoscopy in colorectal polyps' characterization and planning of endoscopic therapy
    Francesco Vito Mandarino, Silvio Danese, Toshio Uraoka, Adolfo Parra‐Blanco, Yasuharu Maeda, Yutaka Saito, Shin‐Ei Kudo, Michael J. Bourke, Marietta Iacucci
    Digestive Endoscopy.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • 4,880 View
  • 106 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
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Efficacy of Underwater Endoscopic Mucosal Resection for Superficial Non-Ampullary Duodenal Epithelial Tumor
Masanori Furukawa, Akira Mitoro, Takahiro Ozutumi, Yukihisa Fujinaga, Keisuke Nakanishi, Koh Kitagawa, Soichiro Saikawa, Sinya Sato, Yasuhiko Sawada, Hiroaki Takaya, Kosuke Kaji, Hideto Kawaratani, Tadashi Namisaki, Kei Moriya, Takemi Akahane, Junichi Yamao, Hitoshi Yoshiji
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):371-378.   Published online February 18, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.147
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Endoscopic resection (ER) for superficial non-ampullary duodenal epithelial tumors (SNADETs) is challenging. Conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (CEMR) is also problematic due to the anatomical features of the duodenum. We compared the safety and efficacy of underwater endoscopic mucosal resection (UEMR) with those of CEMR through a retrospective analysis.
Methods
Altogether, 44 consecutive patients with 46 SNADETs underwent ER (18 CEMR cases and 28 UEMR cases) between January 2016 and October 2019. We investigated the proportions of en bloc resection, R0 resection, complications, resection time, and total procedure time and compared the outcomes of patients from the CEMR group with those of patients from the UEMR group.
Results
The median tumor size was 8.0 mm (range, 2.0–20.0 mm). The UEMR group showed a higher proportion of en bloc resection (96.4% vs. 72.2%, p<0.05) and significantly lower median resection time and total procedure time (4 min vs. 9.5 min, p<0.05 and 13 min vs. 19 min, p<0.05; respectively) than the CEMR group. No complications were observed. However, two patients treated with piecemeal resection in the CEMR group had residual tumors.
Conclusions
UEMR is a feasible therapeutic option for SNADETs. It can be recommended as a standard treatment.

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  • Conventional versus underwater endoscopic resection for superficial non-ampullary duodenal epithelial tumours
    Hajime Miyazaki, Osamu Dohi, Tsugitaka Ishida, Mayuko Seya, Katsuma Yamauchi, Hayato Fukui, Takeshi Yasuda, Takuma Yoshida, Naoto Iwai, Toshifumi Doi, Ryohei Hirose, Ken Inoue, Akihito Harusato, Naohisa Yoshida, Kazuhiko Uchiyama, Tomohisa Takagi, Takeshi
    Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology.2024; 54(2): 137.     CrossRef
  • Can underwater endoscopic mucosal resection be an alternative to conventional endoscopic mucosal resection for superficial non‐ampullary duodenal epithelial tumors?
    Hidenori Tanaka, Yuji Urabe, Hiroki Takemoto, Kazuki Ishibashi, Hirona Konishi, Yuka Matsubara, Yudai Takehara, Shin Morimoto, Fumiaki Tanino, Noriko Yamamoto, Hajime Teshima, Junichi Mizuno, Issei Hirata, Hirosato Tamari, Akiyoshi Tsuboi, Ken Yamashita,
    DEN Open.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Underwater Endoscopic Mucosal Resection Vs Conventional Endoscopic Mucosal Resection for Superficial Nonampullary Duodenal Epithelial Tumors in the Western Setting
    Rui Morais, José Amorim, Renato Medas, Bernardo Sousa-Pinto, João Santos-Antunes, Romain Legros, Jérémie Albouys, Frédéric Moll, Margarida Marques, Filipe Vilas-Boas, Eduardo Rodrigues-Pinto, Irene Gullo, Fátima Carneiro, Elisa Gravito Soares, Pedro Amaro
    Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Underwater versus conventional endoscopic mucosal resection for superficial non-ampullary duodenal epithelial tumors ≤20mm: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Xiu-He Lv, Rong Luo, Qing Lu, Kai Deng, Jin-Lin Yang
    Digestive and Liver Disease.2023; 55(6): 714.     CrossRef
  • Underwater Versus Conventional Endoscopic Mucosal Resection for Superficial Non-ampullary Duodenal Epithelial Tumors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Jae Gon Lee, Sang Pyo Lee, Hyun Joo Jang, Sea Hyub Kae
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences.2023; 68(4): 1482.     CrossRef
  • A feasibility study comparing gel immersion endoscopic resection and underwater endoscopic mucosal resection for superficial nonampullary duodenal epithelial tumors
    Akihiro Miyakawa, Toshio Kuwai, Yukie Sakuma, Manabu Kubota, Akira Nakamura, Ei Itobayashi, Haruhisa Shimura, Yoshio Suzuki, Kenji Shimura
    Endoscopy.2023; 55(03): 261.     CrossRef
  • Underwater Endoscopic Mucosal Resection Versus Conventional Endoscopic Mucosal Resection for Superficial Non-ampullary Duodenal Epithelial Tumors ≤20 mm
    Zhikun Yin, Ji Li, Weilin Yang, Weifeng Huang, Dong Xu, Xiaoyi Lei, Jinyan Zhang
    Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology.2023; 57(9): 928.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of underwater endoscopic mucosal resection for ≤20 mm superficial non-ampullary duodenal epithelial tumors: Systematic review and meta-analysis
    Jixiang Liu, Shaojie Duan, Yichong Wang, Hongye Peng, Youjia Kong, Shukun Yao
    Frontiers in Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Underwater versus conventional EMR for nonpedunculated colorectal lesions: a randomized clinical trial
    Luciano Lenz, Bruno Martins, Gustavo Andrade de Paulo, Fabio Shiguehissa Kawaguti, Elisa Ryoka Baba, Ricardo Sato Uemura, Carla Cristina Gusmon, Sebastian Naschold Geiger, Renata Nobre Moura, Caterina Pennacchi, Marcelo Simas de Lima, Adriana Vaz Safatle-
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2023; 97(3): 549.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic resection of superficial non‐ampullary duodenal epithelial tumor
    Motohiko Kato, Takanori Kanai, Naohisa Yahagi
    DEN Open.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Application of Underwater Endoscopic Mucosal Resection for Nonampullary Duodenal Adenomas
    Xiu-He Lv, Jin-Lin Yang
    Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.2022; 20(8): 1884.     CrossRef
  • Utility of underwater EMR for nonpolypoid superficial nonampullary duodenal epithelial tumors ≤20 mm
    Kenichiro Okimoto, Daisuke Maruoka, Tomoaki Matsumura, Kengo Kanayama, Naoki Akizue, Yuki Ohta, Takashi Taida, Keiko Saito, Yosuke Inaba, Yohei Kawasaki, Makoto Arai, Jun Kato, Naoya Kato
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2022; 95(1): 140.     CrossRef
  • Reply
    Yasushi Yamasaki, Noriya Uedo
    Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.2022; 20(8): 1884.     CrossRef
  • Appropriate selection of endoscopic resection for superficial nonampullary duodenal adenomas in association with recurrence
    Kenichiro Okimoto, Daisuke Maruoka, Tomoaki Matsumura, Kengo Kanayama, Naoki Akizue, Yuki Ohta, Takashi Taida, Keiko Saito, Yosuke Inaba, Yohei Kawasaki, Jun Kato, Naoya Kato
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2022; 95(5): 939.     CrossRef
  • Reply to Lv and Yang
    Motohiko Kato, Yoji Takeuchi, Shu Hoteya, Tsuneo Oyama, Satoru Nonaka, Shoichi Yoshimizu, Naomi Kakushima, Ken Ohata, Hironori Yamamoto, Yuko Hara, Hisashi Doyama, Osamu Dohi, Yasushi Yamasaki, Hiroya Ueyama, Kengo Takimoto, Koichi Kurahara, Tomoaki Tashi
    Endoscopy.2022; 54(05): 523.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic treatment selection for superficial duodenal tumors: pay attention to small lesions
    Xiu-He Lv, Jin-Lin Yang
    Endoscopy.2022; 54(05): 522.     CrossRef
  • Resectability of underwater endoscopic mucosal resection for duodenal tumor: A single‐center, retrospective pilot study
    Yosuke Toya, Masaki Endo, Masanao Yamazato, Shun Yamada, Tomo Kumei, Minami Hirai, Makoto Eizuka, Toshifumi Morishita, Risaburo Akasaka, Shunichi Yanai, Noriyuki Uesugi, Tamotsu Sugai, Takayuki Matsumoto
    Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.2021; 36(11): 3191.     CrossRef
  • 4,376 View
  • 145 Download
  • 16 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
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Underwater Endoscopic Mucosal Resection for 10 mm or Larger Nonpedunculated Colorectal Polyps: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Rajat Garg, Amandeep Singh, Manik Aggarwal, Jaideep Bhalla, Babu P. Mohan, Carol Burke, Tarun Rustagi, Prabhleen Chahal
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):379-389.   Published online April 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.276
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Recent studies have reported the favorable outcomes of underwater endoscopic mucosal resection (UEMR) for colorectal polyps. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy and safety of UEMR for nonpedunculated polyps ≥10 mm.
Methods
We performed a comprehensive search of multiple databases (through May 2020) to identify studies reporting the outcomes of UEMR for ≥10 mm nonpedunculated colorectal polyps. The assessed outcomes were recurrence rate on the first follow-up, en bloc resection, incomplete resection, and adverse events after UEMR.
Results
A total of 1276 polyps from 16 articles were included in our study. The recurrence rate was 7.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.3–12) and 5.9% (95% CI, 3.6–9.4) for nonpedunculated polyps ≥10 and ≥20 mm, respectively. For nonpedunculated polyps ≥10 mm, the en bloc resection, R0 resection, and incomplete resection rates were 57.7% (95% CI, 42.4–71.6), 58.9% (95% CI, 42.4–73.6), and 1.5% (95% CI, 0.8–2.6), respectively. The rates of pooled adverse events, intraprocedural bleeding, and delayed bleeding were 7.0%, 5.4%, and 2.9%, respectively. The rate of perforation and postpolypectomy syndrome was 0.8%.
Conclusions
Our systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrates that UEMR for nonpedunculated colorectal polyps ≥10 mm is safe and effective with a low rate of recurrence.

Citations

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  • Polypectomy Techniques for Pedunculated and Nonpedunculated Polyps
    Karl Kwok, Sasan Mosadeghi, Daniel Lew
    Techniques and Innovations in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2023; 25(4): 361.     CrossRef
  • Underwater versus conventional endoscopic mucosal resection for colorectal lesions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials
    Matheus Henrique Gonçalves de Souza, Paula Arruda do Espirito Santo, Fauze Maluf-Filho, Luciano Lenz
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic treatment of colorectal polyps and early colorectal cancer
    Yunho Jung
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2023; 66(11): 642.     CrossRef
  • EMR and ESD: Indications, techniques and results
    Mamoon Ur Rashid, Mohammad Alomari, Sadaf Afraz, Tolga Erim
    Surgical Oncology.2022; 43: 101742.     CrossRef
  • Safety and effectiveness of underwater cold snare resection without submucosal injection of large non-pedunculated colorectal lesions
    Andrew W. Yen, Joseph W. Leung, Malcom Koo, Felix W. Leung
    Endoscopy International Open.2022; 10(06): E791.     CrossRef
  • Underwater or conventional endoscopic mucosal resection for intermediate‐sized colorectal neoplasm?
    Li‐Chun Chang
    Advances in Digestive Medicine.2021; 8(3): 133.     CrossRef
  • 4,605 View
  • 142 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
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Dedicated Cold Snare vs. Traditional Snare for Polypectomy of Diminutive and Small Lesions in a Porcine Model: A Research Group for Endoscopic Instruments and Stents (REIS) Study
Han Hee Lee, Bo-In Lee, Jung-Wook Kim, Hyun Lim, Si Hyung Lee, Jun-Hyung Cho, Yunho Jung, Kyoung Oh Kim, Chan Gyoo Kim, Kee Myung Lee, Jong-Jae Park, Myung-Gyu Choi, Hoon Jai Chun, Ho Gak Kim
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):390-396.   Published online September 10, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.096
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: The aim of this in vivo animal study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of dedicated cold snare (DCS) compared with those of traditional snare (TS) for cold snare polypectomy (CSP).
Methods
A total of 36 diminutive (5 mm) and 36 small (9 mm) pseudolesions were made by electrocoagulation in the colons of mini-pigs.
Results
For the diminutive lesions, there were no significant differences in technical success rate, procedure time, or complete resection rate between the DCS and TS groups; the rate of uneven resection margin in the DCS group was significantly lower than that of the TS group. For small lesions, technical success rate and complete resection rate were significantly higher in the DCS group than in the TS group (100% [18/18] vs. 55.6% [10/18], p=0.003; 94.4% [17/18] vs. 40% [4/10], p=0.006). In addition, the procedure duration was significantly shorter, and the rate of uneven resection margin was significantly lower in the DCS group (28.5 sec vs. 66.0 sec, p=0.006; 11.1% [2/18] vs. 100% [10/10], p<0.001). Two cases of perforation occurred in the DCS group. Multivariate analysis revealed that DCS use was independently associated with complete resection.
Conclusions
DCS is superior to TS in terms of technical success, complete resection, and reducing the duration of the procedure for CSP of small polyps.

Citations

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  • Comparison of complete resection rates in cold snare polypectomy using two different wire diameter snares: A randomized controlled study
    Toshiki Horii, Sho Suzuki, Akihiro Sugita, Misa Yamauchi, Hisatomo Ikehara, Chika Kusano, Takuji Gotoda
    Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.2023; 38(5): 752.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the clinical efficacy of cold snare polypectomy using a thin-wire snare and thick-wire snare for small colorectal polyps
    Hong Jin Yoon, Yunho Jung, Young Sin Cho, Il-Kwun Chung
    International Journal of Gastrointestinal Intervention.2023; 12(4): 183.     CrossRef
  • Big Issues on Small Polyps: An Ideal Device, But Is It for an Ideal Indication?
    Yoji Takeuchi
    Clinical Endoscopy.2021; 54(3): 297.     CrossRef
  • Cold versus hot polypectomy/endoscopic mucosal resection–A review of current evidence
    Raquel Ortigão, Jochen Weigt, Ahmed Afifi, Diogo Libânio
    United European Gastroenterology Journal.2021; 9(8): 938.     CrossRef
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  • 222 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
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Is Submucosal Injection Helpful in Cold Snare Polypectomy for Small Colorectal Polyps?
Ji Hyun Song, Shai Friedland
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):397-403.   Published online February 9, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.226
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Cold snare polypectomy (CSP) is an effective method of polyp removal for small colorectal polyps. However, the effect of submucosal injection in cold snare endoscopic mucosal resection (CS-EMR) for small polyps is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of submucosal injection in CS-EMR for small polyps.
Methods
Between 2018 and 2019, 100 consecutive small colorectal polyps (5–10 mm) were identified in 58 patients. The first 50 consecutive polyps were removed by CS-EMR, and the remaining 50 were removed by CSP. Demographic data, clinical data, endoscopic findings, procedure times, complication rates, and pathology data were collected.
Results
No difference in the complete resection rate was observed between the CS-EMR and CSP groups. A total of 9 polyps showed post-polypectomy bleeding (7 had immediate bleeding, 1 had delayed bleeding, and 1 had both immediate and delayed bleeding). No difference in the bleeding rate was observed between the two groups. In multivariate analysis, warfarin (odds ratio [OR], 42.334; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.006–1,781.758) and direct-acting oral anticoagulants (OR, 35.244; 95% CI, 3.853–322.397) showed a significantly increased risk of bleeding.
Conclusions
The effect of submucosal injection in CSP was not significant for small colorectal polyps.

Citations

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  • Cold sub-mucosal injection versus traditional cold snare polypectomy for diminutive and small colorectal polyps: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Yong-Cai Lv, Quan Dong, Yan-Hua Yao, Jing-Jing Lei
    Indian Journal of Gastroenterology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Colorectal cold snare polypectomy: Current standard technique and future perspectives
    Fumiaki Ishibashi, Sho Suzuki, Mizuki Nagai, Kentaro Mochida, Tetsuo Morishita
    Digestive Endoscopy.2023; 35(3): 278.     CrossRef
  • The efficacy and safety of cold snare polypectomy with submucosal injection for the removal of polyps less than 20 mm in size: a systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Zheng Liang, Yongqiu Wei, Shutian Zhang, Peng Li
    Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.2023; 38(11): 1892.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Submucosal Saline Injection During Cold Snare Polypectomy for Colorectal Polyps Sized 3–9 mm: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial
    Yi Mou, Liansong Ye, Xiaobo Qin, Rui Feng, Lifan Zhang, Qin Hu, Tingting Cao, Xinyue Zhou, Wu Wen, Chuanming Zhang, Zonghua Chen, Yi Liu, Zhimin Yang, Tao Huo, Fang Pan, Xuelian Li, Bing Hu
    American Journal of Gastroenterology.2023; 118(10): 1848.     CrossRef
  • Cold resection for colorectal polyps: where we are and where we are going?
    Antonio Capogreco, Ludovico Alfarone, Davide Massimi, Alessandro Repici
    Expert Review of Gastroenterology & Hepatology.2023; 17(7): 719.     CrossRef
  • Cold snare endoscopic mucosal resection for colon polyps: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mohamed Abdallah, Khalid Ahmed, Daniyal Abbas, Mouhand F. H. Mohamed, Gaurav Suryawanshi, Nicholas McDonald, Natalie Wilson, Shifa Umar, Aasma Shaukat, Mohammad Bilal
    Endoscopy.2023; 55(12): 1083.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic treatment of colorectal polyps and early colorectal cancer
    Yunho Jung
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2023; 66(11): 642.     CrossRef
  • 4,443 View
  • 167 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
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Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Using a 22-G Needle for Hepatic Lesions: Single-Center Experience
Ebru Akay, Deniz Atasoy, Engin Altınkaya, Ali Koç, Tamer Ertan, Hatice Karaman, Erkan Caglar
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):404-412.   Published online December 9, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.065
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been accepted as a reliable tool in diagnosing and staging intra-abdominal tumors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the performance of EUS-FNA in the evaluation of liver masses and its impact on patient management and procedure-related complications retrospectively.
Methods
Data of patients who underwent EUS-FNA biopsies due to liver masses between November 2017 and July 2018 were retrieved retrospectively. Biopsies were performed using 22-G needles. The demographics, EUS-FNA results, sensitivity and specificity of the procedure, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and specimen sufficiency rates were assessed.
Results
A total of 25 patients (10 females) were included in the study. The mean age was 62.73±15.2 years. The mean size of the masses was 34.50±16.04 mm. The technical success rate was 88%. During the EUS-FNA procedure, each patient had only one pass with 94.45% of aspirate sufficiency rate and 86.3% of biopsy sufficiency rate. The diagnostic accuracy rate was 86.3%. There were no complications.
Conclusions
For the evaluation of liver masses, EUS-FNA using a 22-G needle with even one pass had high aspiration and biopsy success rates accompanied with high diagnostic accuracy rates.

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    Yuichi Takano, Naoki Tamai, Masataka Yamawaki, Jun Noda, Tetsushi Azami, Fumitaka Niiya, Fumiya Nishimoto, Naotaka Maruoka, Tatsuya Yamagami, Masatsugu Nagahama
    DEN Open.2025;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic and therapeutic role of endoscopic ultrasound in liver diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Eyad Gadour, Abeer Awad, Zeinab Hassan, Khalid Jebril Shrwani, Bogdan Miutescu, Hussein Hassan Okasha
    World Journal of Gastroenterology.2024; 30(7): 742.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue acquisition for the diagnosis of focal liver lesion
    Alina Tantău, Cosmina Sutac, Anamaria Pop, Marcel Tantău
    World Journal of Radiology.2024; 16(4): 72.     CrossRef
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    Marcel Ioan Gheorghiu, Andrada Seicean, Cristina Pojoga, Claudia Hagiu, Radu Seicean, Zeno Sparchez
    World Journal of Gastroenterology.2024; 30(17): 2311.     CrossRef
  • Full title of the article: Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration in the Diagnostic Value of Focal Liver Lesions: a Systematic Analysis of 88 Cases (with video)
    Xiaohong Kong, Zijun Fan, Ruiping Li, Duanmin Hu, Guilian Cheng
    Clinics and Research in Hepatology and Gastroenterology.2024; : 102382.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Biopsy of Focal Liver Lesions: An Effective Mini-Invasive Alternative to the Percutaneous Approach
    Gabriele Rancatore, Dario Ligresti, Giacomo Emanuele Maria Rizzo, Lucio Carrozza, Mario Traina, Ilaria Tarantino
    Diagnostics.2024; 14(13): 1336.     CrossRef
  • A case in which ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration was useful in the diagnosis of liver metastasis of gallbladder cancer
    Ayako Inada, Masao Toki, Takahiro Yamada, Sho Kawamoto, Komei Kambayashi, Takeshi Nosaka, Kazushige Ochiai, Koichi Gondo, Shunsuke Watanabe, Akimasa Hayashi, Hiroaki Shimoyamada, Junji Shibahara, Tadakazu Hisamatsu
    Progress of Digestive Endoscopy.2023; 102(1): 140.     CrossRef
  • Endo-hepatology: Updates for the clinical hepatologist
    Frances Lee, Tarun Rustagi, R. Todd Frederick
    Clinical Liver Disease.2023; 22(2): 42.     CrossRef
  • Distinct ways to perform a liver biopsy: The core technique setups and updated understanding of these modalities
    Chao Sun, Xingliang Zhao, Lei Shi, Xiaofei Fan, Xiaolong Qi
    Endoscopic Ultrasound.2023; 12(6): 437.     CrossRef
  • Role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided liver biopsy: a meta-analysis
    Keyu Zeng, Zhenpeng Jiang, Jie Yang, Kefei Chen, Qiang Lu
    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology.2022; 57(5): 545.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Biopsy versus Fine-Needle Aspiration in the Diagnosis of Focal Liver Lesions: Prospective Head-to-Head Comparison
    Marcel Gheorghiu, Andrada Seicean, Sorana D. Bolboacă, Ioana Rusu, Radu Seicean, Cristina Pojoga, Ofelia Moșteanu, Zeno Sparchez
    Diagnostics.2022; 12(9): 2214.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration for Focal Liver Lesions: The Expanding Light Over the Shadow
    Takuji Iwashita, Masahito Shimizu
    Clinical Endoscopy.2021; 54(3): 299.     CrossRef
  • Hepatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration
    Koki Yamada, Susumu Shinoura, Kaoru Kikuchi, Chia-Tung Shun
    Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound in Liver Disease: Where Do We Stand?
    Tajana Pavic, Ivana Mikolasevic, Dominik Kralj, Nina Blazevic, Anita Skrtic, Ivan Budimir, Ivan Lerotic, Davor Hrabar
    Diagnostics.2021; 11(11): 2021.     CrossRef
  • 4,707 View
  • 126 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
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Novel Ablation Therapy Using Endoscopic Irreversible Electroporation in the Bile Duct: A Pilot Animal Study
Kang Won Lee, Jae Min Lee, Hyuk Soon Choi, Eun Sun Kim, Bora Keum, Yeon Seok Seo, Yoon Tae Jeen, Soon Ho Um, Hong Sik Lee, Hoon Jai Chun, Chang Duck Kim, Chi Hyuk Oh, Hong Bae Kim
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):413-419.   Published online October 20, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.126
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a relatively new ablation method. However, the application of IRE ablation in the treatment of biliary disease has not been attempted. A minimally invasive approach using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) can be a novel therapeutic modality for IRE ablation. In this study, we aimed to investigate the feasibility of endoscopic IRE for the biliary tract using an animal model.
Methods
A new catheter-type electrode was developed for endoscopic IRE ablation of the biliary tract. We performed ERCP and endoscopic IRE ablations in the normal common bile duct of Yorkshire pigs. The experimental setting of IRE was 500 V/cm (50 pulses, 100-µs length). The animals were sacrificed after 24 hr, and the ablated bile duct was examined.
Results
Well-demarcated focal color changes were observed on the mucosa of the common bile duct. The depth of change after IRE was confined to the mucosal and submucosal layers. Apoptotic changes in the bile duct were observed only around the IRE ablation area. Immunohistochemistry assay showed cell death in the bile duct along the electrode.
Conclusions
Endoscopic IRE ablation using ERCP was successfully performed in the common bile duct. It can be a potential option for the treatment of biliary tumors.

Citations

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  • Balloon‐assisted laser application for endoscopic treatment of biliary stricture
    Seonghee Lim, Van Gia Truong, Seok Jeong, Jiho Lee, Byeong‐il Lee, Hyun Wook Kang
    Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.2023; 55(10): 912.     CrossRef
  • Biliary complications and efficacy after ablation of peribiliary tumors using irreversible electroporation (IRE) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA)
    Somrach Thamtorawat, Rujira Patanawanitkul, Satit Rojwatcharapibarn, Walailak Chaiyasoot, Trongtum Tongdee, Jirawadee Yodying, Sukrit Sorotpinya
    International Journal of Hyperthermia.2022; 39(1): 751.     CrossRef
  • Large Animal Models in Pancreas and Biliary Disease
    Seok Jeong, Jin-Seok Park, Don Haeng Lee
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology.2021; 77(3): 99.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of four endoluminal radiofrequency ablation devices and four power generators in an ex vivo bovine liver model
    Stephan Rheinheimer, Anna Jacobsen, Philipp Mayer, Hans-Ulrich Kauczor, Andreas Mahnken
    World Academy of Sciences Journal.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
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Confirming Whether Fine Needle Biopsy Device Shortens the Learning Curve of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Without Rapid Onsite Evaluation
Meng-Ying Lin, Cheng-Lin Wu, Mitsuhiro Kida, Wei-Lun Chang, Bor-Shyang Sheu
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):420-427.   Published online May 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.184
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition requires a long learning curve. We aimed to compare the skill maturation curves between fine needle aspiration (FNA) and biopsy (FNB) for tissue acquisition.
Methods
The initial 60 procedures performed by the trainee endosonographer (30 FNA vs. 30 FNB) were consecutively enrolled. The difference in procedure performance was compared between the two groups. Learning curves were assessed. Twenty additional cases were subsequently enrolled to assess the consistency of performance in the FNB group.
Results
The FNB group acquired larger tissue samples (2.35 vs. 0.70 mm2; p<0.001) with lower blood content (p=0.001) and higher tissue quality (p=0.017) compared with the FNA group. In addition, the FNB group required less needle pass to establish a diagnosis (2.43 vs. 2.97; p=0.006). A threshold diagnostic sensitivity of ≥80% was achieved after performing 10 FNB procedures. The number of needle passes significantly decreased after conducting 20 FNB procedures (1.80 vs. 2.70; p=0.041). The diagnostic sensitivity and number of needle passes remained the same in the subsequent FNB procedures. By contrast, this skill maturation phenomenon was not observed after performing 30 FNA procedures.
Conclusions
In EUS-guided tissue acquisition, the FNB needle was more efficient and thus shortened the learning curve of EUSguided tissue acquisition in trainee endosonographers.

Citations

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  • Tissue Quality Comparison Between Heparinized Wet Suction and Dry Suction in Endoscopic Ultrasound-Fine Needle Biopsy of Solid Pancreatic Masses: A Randomized Crossover Study
    Meng-Ying Lin, Cheng-Lin Wu, Yung-Yeh Su, Chien-Jui Huang, Wei-Lun Chang, Bor-Shyang Sheu
    Gut and Liver.2023; 17(2): 318.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting the Learning Curve in the Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Sampling of Solid Pancreatic Lesions: A Prospective Study
    Marcel Razpotnik, Simona Bota, Mathilde Kutilek, Gerolf Essler, Christian Urak, Julian Prosenz, Jutta Weber-Eibel, Andreas Maieron, Markus Peck-Radosavljevic
    Gut and Liver.2023; 17(2): 308.     CrossRef
  • Investigation into the content of red material in EUS-guided pancreatic cancer biopsies
    Meng-Ying Lin, Yung-Yeh Su, Yu-Ting Yu, Chien-Jui Huang, Bor-Shyang Sheu, Wei-Lun Chang
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2023; 97(6): 1083.     CrossRef
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  • 70 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
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Case Reports
Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Endoscopic Outcomes in Patients with SARS-CoV-2
Faruq Pradhan, Yasmin Alishahi
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):428-431.   Published online March 3, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.244
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Over the past year, the novel coronavirus has been a topic of significant research. Multiple gastroenterological symptoms have been associated with this infection, in addition to the well-established pulmonary presentations. Gastrointestinal bleeding can be a complication of infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2, which can be exacerbated by the anticoagulants used to treat its thrombotic sequelae. We describe the clinical cases of four patients infected with the novel coronavirus, with significant upper gastrointestinal bleeding requiring endoscopic visualization, along with their clinical outcomes.

Citations

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  • Prevalence and outcomes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in COVID‐19: A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Sawai Singh Rathore, Zario Shai Wint, Aman Goyal, Bijay Mukesh Jeswani, Ameer Mustafa Farrukh, María Alejandra Nieto‐Salazar, Thanmai Reddy Thugu, Snigdha Erva, Raafay Mehmood, Adriana Carolina Toro‐velandia, Hamam Aneis, Sunny Ratnani, Ibrahim Marouf Yas
    Reviews in Medical Virology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gastrointestinal Bleeding in COVID-19 Infected Patients, and Management Outcomes
    Amnah Al Hanaei, Fatima AlKindi, Aysha Alkhemeiri, Satish Nair
    International Journal of General Medicine.2024; Volume 17: 1145.     CrossRef
  • Gastrointestinal Bleeding in COVID-19-Infected Patients
    Mitchell S. Cappell, David M. Friedel
    Gastroenterology Clinics of North America.2023; 52(1): 77.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic findings are not different in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding with COVID-19
    Fatma Ebru AKIN, Öykü TAYFUR YÜREKLİ, Mustafa TAHTACI, Osman ERSOY
    Akademik Gastroenteroloji Dergisi.2023; 22(1): 20.     CrossRef
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Gastric Angiolipoma Resected with Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection
Sang Myung Yeo, Jae Kwang Lee, Hyun Soo Kim, Chang Geun Park, Jae Kwon Jung, Dae Jin Kim, Yun Jin Chung, Han Jun Ryu
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):432-435.   Published online March 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.146
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Angiolipoma is a benign fatty neoplasm that has components of proliferating blood vessels. These types of lesions commonly occur in the subcutaneous tissue of the limbs and trunk. Angiolipoma in the gastrointestinal tract is extremely rare, and the final diagnosis generally depends on histological examination of the excised biopsy. In most previously reported cases, the lesions were diagnosed and treated with surgical management. In this study, we report a case of gastric angiolipoma of approximately 4 cm in size that was diagnosed and treated with endoscopic submucosal dissection.

Citations

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  • A rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an elderly female: Gastric Angiolipoma
    Xiufan Ni, Sujun Gao, Lei Chen, Li Zhang, Jian Yin, Zhen Zhu
    Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Huge Gastric Angiolipoma Presenting with Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: A Case Report
    Joo Hyeok Choi, Sung Bin Park, Jong Beum Lee, Tae-Jin Lee, Hyun Jeong Park, Eun Sun Lee
    Current Medical Imaging Formerly Current Medical Imaging Reviews.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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  • 80 Download
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Underwater Endoscopic Mucosal Resection without Submucosal Injection Facilitates En bloc Resection of Colon Adenomas Extending into a Diverticulum
Yoshikazu Hayashi, Masahiro Okada, Takaaki Morikawa, Tatsuma Nomura, Hisashi Fukuda, Takahito Takezawa, Alan Kawarai Lefor, Hironori Yamamoto
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):436-440.   Published online November 6, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.168
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReaderePub
Superficial colonic neoplasms sometimes extend into a diverticulum. Conventional endoscopic mucosal resection of these lesions is considered challenging because colonic diverticula do not have a muscularis propria and are deeply inverted. Even if the solution is carefully injected below the mucosa at the bottom of the diverticulum, the mucosa is rarely elevated from the diverticular orifice, and it is usually just narrowed. Although endoscopic submucosal dissection or full-thickness resection with an over-the-scope clip device enables the complete resection of these lesions, it is still challenging, time consuming and expensive. Underwater endoscopic mucosal resection without submucosal injection (UEMR) is an innovative technique enabling en bloc resection of superficial colon lesions. We report three patients with colon adenomas extending into a diverticulum treated with successful UEMR. UEMR enabled rapid and safe en bloc resection of colon lesions extending into a diverticulum.

Citations

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  • Underwater endoscopic mucosal resection for colorectal lesions: Can it be an “Underwater” revolution?
    Yoji Takeuchi, Satoki Shichijo, Noriya Uedo, Ryu Ishihara
    DEN Open.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • 3,871 View
  • 113 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
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Brief Reports
Bleeding on the Edge—The Use of Hemostatic Powder for Treating a Bleeding Hypopharyngeal Tumor
Shirley H. Bong, Bernice W. Tan, Jui May Yong, Li Shia Ng, Calvin J. Koh
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):441-442.   Published online August 19, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.159
PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReaderePub

Citations

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  • Efficacy and safety of novel hemostatic gel in endoscopic sphincterotomy or endoscopic papillectomy: A multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial
    Jin Ho Choi, In Rae Cho, Sang Hyub Lee, Joo Seong Kim, Namyoung Park, Min Woo Lee, Dong Kee Jang, Woo Hyun Paik, Dong Won Ahn, Ji Kon Ryu, Yong-Tae Kim, Eunji Kim, Jaeyoung Lee
    Digestive and Liver Disease.2023; 55(4): 527.     CrossRef
  • 3,454 View
  • 72 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
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Blind Spot of Enteral Stenting for Malignant Duodenal Obstruction due to Colon Cancer: A Rare Case of Duodenocolonic Fistula
Takashi Sasaki, Takafumi Mie, Naoki Sasahira
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):443-444.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.140
PDFPubReaderePub
  • 3,205 View
  • 68 Download
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Letter to the Editor
The Dramatic Change in Endoscopic Activities Following the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Outbreak. Is It Evolution?
Kook Hyun Kim
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):445-446.   Published online May 4, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.092
PDFPubReaderePub
  • 2,493 View
  • 61 Download
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Boost Your Learning with Quiz
Diagnosis of Gastric Subepithelial Tumor: Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Biopsy
Ga Hee Kim, Ji Yong Ahn
Clin Endosc 2021;54(3):447-448.   Published online May 17, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.134
PDFPubReaderePub
  • 3,691 View
  • 89 Download
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