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Volume 54(6); November 2021
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Commentarys
Commentary on “Comparative Study of Narrow-Band Imaging and i-scan for Predicting the Histology of Intermediate-to-Large Colorectal Polyps: A Prospective, Randomized Pilot Study”
Yunho Jung, Masayuki Kato
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):781-782.   Published online November 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.206
PDFPubReaderePub

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Classification and endoscopic diagnosis of colorectal polyps
    Ji Hyun Kim, Sung Chul Park
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2023; 66(11): 633.     CrossRef
  • 2,760 View
  • 105 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
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Transpapillary Gallbladder Drainage for Acute Cholecystitis: Two Stents or Not Two Stents
Jad AbiMansour, Ryan Law
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):783-784.   Published online October 14, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.213
PDFPubReaderePub

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Tips and tricks for endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage
    Jad P. AbiMansour, Ryan J. Law, Andrew C. Storm, Vinay Chandrasekhara
    VideoGIE.2023; 8(11): 474.     CrossRef
  • 2,784 View
  • 109 Download
  • 1 Crossref
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Treatment of Walled-off Necrosis – Outcomes are Best When Endoscopy and Percutaneous Interventions are Complimentary, Not Exclusive
Ji Young Bang, Shyam Varadarajulu
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):785-786.   Published online November 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.258
PDFPubReaderePub
  • 2,129 View
  • 68 Download
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Focused Review Series: Endoscopic Managements of Postoperative Gastrointestinal Complication: What’s New?
Current Status of Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy in the Management of Esophageal Perforations and Post-Operative Leaks
Imogen Livingstone, Lily Pollock, Bruno Sgromo, Sotiris Mastoridis
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):787-797.   Published online November 16, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.240
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Esophageal wall defects, including perforations and postoperative leaks, are associated with high morbidity and mortality and pose a significant management challenge. In light of the high morbidity of surgical management or revision, in recent years, endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) has emerged as a novel alternative treatment strategy. EVT involves transoral endoscopic placement of a polyurethane sponge connected to an externalized nasogastric tube to provide continuous negative pressure with the intention of promoting defect healing, facilitating cavity drainage, and ameliorating sepsis. In the last decade, EVT has become increasingly adopted in the management of a diverse spectrum of esophageal defects. Its popularity has been attributed in part to the growing body of evidence suggesting superior outcomes and defect closure rates in excess of 80%. This growing body of evidence, coupled with the ongoing evolution of the technology and techniques of deployment, suggests that the utilization of EVT has become increasingly widespread. Here, we aimed to review the current status of the field, addressing the mechanism of action, indications, technique methodology, efficacy, safety, and practical considerations of EVT implementation. We also sought to highlight future directions for the use of EVT in esophageal wall defects.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Multi-modality management of defects in the gastrointestinal tract: Where the endoscope meets the scalpel: Endoscopic vacuum therapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract
    Lisanne M.D. Pattynama, Wietse J. Eshuis, Stefan Seewald, Roos E. Pouw
    Best Practice & Research Clinical Gastroenterology.2024; : 101901.     CrossRef
  • Management of esophageal anastomotic leaks, a systematic review and network meta-analysis
    William Murray, Mathew G Davey, William Robb, Noel E Donlon
    Diseases of the Esophagus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Management of an Aortoesophageal Fistula With Esophageal Endoluminal Wound Vacuum Therapy
    Antoine Nehme, Samuel Brown, Salman Zaheer, Alexander Leung
    Annals of Thoracic Surgery Short Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Treatment of Esophageal-Pleural Fistula After Diverticulectomy Using Transluminal Vacuum Therapy in a Patient with HIV Infection
    M. A. Panasyuk, G. Yu. Aldaranov, V. N. Makhutov, E. G. Grigoriev
    Russian Sklifosovsky Journal "Emergency Medical Care".2024; 13(1): 156.     CrossRef
  • Successful Endoscopic Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy for Esophageal Perforation: A Case Report
    Jung Huh, Jinsun Yang, Seung Joo Kang, Hyoun Woo Kang, Hyeon Jong Moon, Su Hwan Kim, Bokyung Kim, Ji Won Kim, Kook Lae Lee, Yong Won Seong, Kwang Woo Kim
    The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research.2024; 24(2): 187.     CrossRef
  • VAC-Stent in the Treatment of Post-Esophagectomy Anastomotic Leaks: A New “Kid on the Block” Who Marries the Best of Old Techniques—A Review
    Giuseppe Dell’Anna, Lorella Fanti, Jacopo Fanizza, Rukaia Barà, Alberto Barchi, Ernesto Fasulo, Ugo Elmore, Riccardo Rosati, Vito Annese, Liboria Laterza, Lorenzo Fuccio, Francesco Azzolini, Silvio Danese, Francesco Vito Mandarino
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2024; 13(13): 3805.     CrossRef
  • Homemade endoscopic vacuum therapy device for the management of transmural gastrointestinal defects
    Diogo Turiani Hourneaux de Moura, Bruno Salomão Hirsch, Thomas R. McCarty, Marcos Eduardo Lera dos Santos, Hugo Gonçalo Guedes, Guilherme Francisco Gomes, Flaubert Sena de Medeiros, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux de Moura
    Digestive Endoscopy.2023; 35(6): 745.     CrossRef
  • Choosing the best endoscopic approach for post-bariatric surgical leaks and fistulas: Basic principles and recommendations
    Victor Lira de Oliveira, Alexandre Moraes Bestetti, Roberto Paolo Trasolini, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux de Moura, Diogo Turiani Hourneaux de Moura
    World Journal of Gastroenterology.2023; 29(7): 1173.     CrossRef
  • Vacuum-Assisted Closure Treats Refractory Esophageal Leak in a Pediatric Patient
    Evan K Lin, Felicia Lee, Jasmin Cao, Christian Saliba, Vivian Lu, Raymond I Okeke, Justin Sobrino, Christopher Blewett
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Esophageal Perforation
    Kelly Fairbairn, Stephanie G. Worrell
    Thoracic Surgery Clinics.2023; 33(2): 117.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Treatment of Non-malignant Esophageal Perforation: Time to Go Vacuum?
    Diogo Turiani Hourneaux de Moura, Bruno Salomão Hirsch, Heli Clóvis de Medeiros Neto, Victor Lira de Oliveira, Alexandre Moraes Bestetti, Bruna Furia Buzetti Hourneaux de Moura, Mouen A. Khashab, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux de Moura
    Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology.2023; 21(2): 95.     CrossRef
  • Prophylactic endoluminal vacuum therapy after major gastrointestinal surgery: a systematic review
    Olga Adamenko, Carlo Ferrari, Stefan Seewald, Jan Schmidt
    Updates in Surgery.2022; 74(4): 1177.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Management of Esophageal Cancer
    Christopher Paiji, Alireza Sedarat
    Cancers.2022; 14(15): 3583.     CrossRef
  • 4,756 View
  • 252 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
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Over-the-Scope Clip in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Leaks and Perforations
Mike T. Wei, Ji Yong Ahn, Shai Friedland
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):798-804.   Published online November 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.250
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
While perforations, postoperative fistulas, and leaks have traditionally led to surgical or interventional radiology consultation for management, the introduction of the over-the-scope clip has allowed increased therapeutic possibilities for endoscopists. While primarily limited to case reports and series, the over-the-scope clip successfully manages gastrointestinal bleeding, perforations, as well as postoperative leaks and fistulas. Retrospective studies have demonstrated a relatively high success rate and a low complication rate. Given the similarity to variceal banding equipment, the learning curve with the over-the-scope clip is rapid. However, given the higher risk of procedures involving the use of the over-the-scope clip, it is essential to obtain the scope in a stable position and grasp sufficient tissue with the cap using a grasping tool and/or suction. From our experience, while closure may be successful in lesions sized up to 3 cm, successful outcomes are obtained for lesions sized <1 cm. Ultimately, given the limited available data, prospective randomized trials are needed to better evaluate the utility of the over-the-scope clip in various clinical scenarios, including fistula and perforation management.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Multicenter Survey of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in 2019 at Korean Medical Institutions
    Jun Woo Park, Tae Gyun Kim, Kwang Bum Cho, Jeong Seok Kim, Jin Woong Cho, Jung Won Jeon, Sun Gyo Lim, Chan Gyoo Kim, Hong Jun Park, Tae Jun Kim, Eun Sun Kim, Su Jin Jeong, Yong Hwan Kwon
    Gut and Liver.2024; 18(1): 77.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Practice Guideline for Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy
    Chung Hyun Tae, Ju Yup Lee, Moon Kyung Joo, Chan Hyuk Park, Eun Jeong Gong, Cheol Min Shin, Hyun Lim, Hyuk Soon Choi, Miyoung Choi, Sang Hoon Kim, Chul-Hyun Lim, Jeong-Sik Byeon, Ki-Nam Shim, Geun Am Song, Moon Sung Lee, Jong-Jae Park, Oh Young Lee
    Gut and Liver.2024; 18(1): 10.     CrossRef
  • Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery
    Bao-Ngoc Nasri, Robert B. Lim, James Ellsmere, Alisha R. Fernandes, Daniel B. Jones
    Current Problems in Surgery.2024; : 101549.     CrossRef
  • Use of anchor pronged clips to close complex polyp resection defects
    Mike Tzuhen Wei, Shai Friedland
    VideoGIE.2023; 8(6): 245.     CrossRef
  • Novel endoscopic management of gastroenterological anastomosis leakage by injecting gel-forming solutions: an experimental animal study
    Yusuke Watanabe, Keiko Yamamoto, Zijian Yang, Haruna Tsuchibora, Masakazu Fujii, Masayoshi Ono, Shoko Ono, Takayuki Kurokawa, Naoya Sakamoto
    Surgical Endoscopy.2023; 37(10): 8029.     CrossRef
  • Clinical practice guidelines for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy
    Chung Hyun Tae, Ju Yup Lee, Moon Kyung Joo, Chan Hyuk Park, Eun Jeong Gong, Cheol Min Shin, Hyun Lim, Hyuk Soon Choi, Miyoung Choi, Sang Hoon Kim, Chul-Hyun Lim, Jeong-Sik Byeon, Ki-Nam Shim, Geun Am Song, Moon Sung Lee, Jong-Jae Park, Oh Young Lee
    Clinical Endoscopy.2023; 56(4): 391.     CrossRef
  • Management of complications related to colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection
    Tae-Geun Gweon, Dong-Hoon Yang
    Clinical Endoscopy.2023; 56(4): 423.     CrossRef
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Obesity: Bariatric Surgery as Both the Cause and the Cure in the Morbidly Obese Population
    Muaaz Masood, Donald Low, Shanley B. Deal, Richard A. Kozarek
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(17): 5543.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Practice Guideline for Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy
    Chung Hyun Tae, Ju Yup Lee, Moon Kyung Joo, Chan Hyuk Park, Eun Jeong Gong, Cheol Min Shin, Hyun Lim, Hyuk Soon Choi, Miyoung Choi, Sang Hoon Kim, Chul-Hyun Lim, Jeong-Sik Byeon, Ki-Nam Shim, Geun Am Song, Moon Sung Lee, Jong-Jae Park, Oh Young Lee
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology.2023; 82(3): 107.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Management of Esophageal Cancer
    Christopher Paiji, Alireza Sedarat
    Cancers.2022; 14(15): 3583.     CrossRef
  • Use of a novel dual-action clip for closure of complex endoscopic resection defects
    Mike Tzuhen Wei, Shai Friedland
    VideoGIE.2022; 7(11): 389.     CrossRef
  • 3,780 View
  • 124 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
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Endoscopic Management of Staple Line Leak after Bariatric Surgery: Surgeon’s Perspective
Yoona Chung, Dae Geun Park, Yong Jin Kim
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):805-809.   Published online May 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.298
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has become a standalone primary procedure as a bariatric metabolic surgery since the early 2000s. The overall complication rate of LSG is reported to range from 2% to 15%. Staple line leakage (SLL) remains a major adverse event and occurs in approximately 1–6% of patients. Choosing the optimal treatment modality is a complex process. Clinicians must understand that nutritional support and drainage of fluid collection are essential for initial management. Conservative endoscopic management and sufficient drainage can resolve approximately 70% of SLLs. Endoscopic management of bariatric complications has been rapidly evolving in recent years and can be considered in all patients who are hemodynamically stable. We will review the available endoscopic management techniques, including stent placement (self-expanding stents and bariatric-specific stents), clipping, tissue sealant application, and internal drainage (double-pigtail stents [DPS] placement, endoscopic vacuum therapy, and septotomy). Stent placement remains the mainstream treatment for SLLs. However, healing with stents requires multiple sessions/stents and a long course of recovery. Endoscopic internal drainage is gaining popularity and has the potential to be a superior method. The importance of early intervention and combined endoscopic methods should be recognized.

Citations

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    Abdelrahman Yakout, Enrique F. Elli, Vivek Kumbhari, Nader Bakheet
    Current Opinion in Gastroenterology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Muaaz Masood, Donald E. Low, Shanley B. Deal, Richard A. Kozarek
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2024; 13(7): 2011.     CrossRef
  • Esophagojejunostomy or Fistulojejunostomy Are Safe Salvage Operations for Bariatric Surgery Leaks
    Steven G. Leeds, Kacie R. Kerlee, Lucas Fair, Daniel Tran, Daniel G. Davis, Gerald O. Ogola, Marc A. Ward
    Foregut: The Journal of the American Foregut Society.2023; 3(2): 157.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of long-term quality of life outcomes between endoscopic vacuum therapy and other treatments for upper gastrointestinal leaks
    Lucas Fair, Marc Ward, Meghana Vankina, Rashmeen Rana, Titus McGowan, Gerald Ogola, Bola Aladegbami, Steven Leeds
    Surgical Endoscopy.2023; 37(8): 6538.     CrossRef
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Obesity: Bariatric Surgery as Both the Cause and the Cure in the Morbidly Obese Population
    Muaaz Masood, Donald Low, Shanley B. Deal, Richard A. Kozarek
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(17): 5543.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors and Management Approaches for Staple Line Leaks Following Sleeve Gastrectomy: A Single-Center Retrospective Study of 402 Patients
    Georgios-Ioannis Verras, Francesk Mulita, Charalampos Lampropoulos, Dimitrios Kehagias, Oliver Curwen, Andreas Antzoulas, Ioannis Panagiotopoulos, Vasileios Leivaditis, Ioannis Kehagias
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2023; 13(9): 1422.     CrossRef
  • Role of Endoscopic Internal Drainage in Treating Gastro-Bronchial and Gastro-Colic Fistula After Sleeve Gastrectomy
    Alessandra D’Alessandro, Giovanni Galasso, Francesco Paolo Zito, Cristiano Giardiello, Fabrizio Cereatti, Roberto Arienzo, Filippo Pacini, Jean-Marc Chevallier, Gianfranco Donatelli
    Obesity Surgery.2022; 32(2): 342.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness and Safety of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy for Weight Loss in Mild Obesity: Prospective Cohort Study with 3-Year Follow-up
    Ahmed Elnabil-Mortada, Haitham M. Elmaleh, Roger Ackroyd, Rabbah A. Khaled
    Obesity Surgery.2022; 32(6): 1918.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Self-Expanding Metallic Stent Placement in the Management of Post Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy Complications
    Hamidreza Goudarzi, Jacob R. Obney, Mahsa Hemmatizadeh, Taha Anbara
    Journal of Digestive Endoscopy.2022; 13(03): 136.     CrossRef
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    Clara Boeker, Barbara Schneider, Valentin Markov, Julian Mall, Christian Reetz, Ludwig Wilkens, Ibrahim Hakami, Christine Stroh, Hinrich Köhler
    Frontiers in Surgery.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • 4,007 View
  • 178 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
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Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Gastroenterostomy for Afferent Loop Syndrome
Hideyuki Shiomi, Arata Sakai, Ryota Nakano, Shogo Ota, Takashi Kobayashi, Atsuhiro Masuda, Hiroko Iijima
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):810-817.   Published online November 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.234
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Afferent loop syndrome (ALS) is a mechanical obstruction of the afferent limbs after gastrectomy with gastrojejunostomy reconstruction. Patients with cancer recurrence require immediate and less invasive treatment because of their poor condition. Percutaneous transhepatic/transluminal drainage (PTD) and endoscopic enteral stenting offer reasonable palliative treatment for malignant ALS but are not fully satisfactory in terms of patient quality of life (QoL) and stent patency. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastroenterostomy (EUS-GE) using a lumen-apposing metal stent may address these shortcomings. Clinical data from 11 reports showed that all patients who had undergone EUS-GE had positive technical and clinical outcomes. The adverse event rate was 11.4%, including only mild or moderate abdominal pain, with no severe adverse events. Indirect comparative studies indicated that patients who had undergone EUS-GE had a significantly superior QoL, a higher clinical success rate, and a lower reintervention rate than those who had undergone PTD or endoscopic enteral stenting. Although the evidence is limited, EUS-GE may be considered as a first-line treatment for malignant ALS because it has better clinical outcomes than other less invasive treatments, such as PTD or endoscopic enteral stenting. Further prospective randomized control trials are necessary to establish EUS-GE as a standard treatment for ALS.

Citations

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  • Endoscopic ultrasound‐guided gastrointestinal anastomosis: Are we there yet?
    Vinay Dhir, Cesar Jaurrieta‐Rico, Vivek Kumar Singh
    Digestive Endoscopy.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hideyuki Shiomi, Ryota Nakano, Shogo Ota, Hiroko Iijima
    Endoscopy.2023; 55(S 01): E362.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Gastrojejunostomy for Malignant Afferent Loop Syndrome Using a Fully Covered Metal Stent: A Multicenter Experience
    Saburo Matsubara, Sho Takahashi, Naminatsu Takahara, Keito Nakagawa, Kentaro Suda, Takeshi Otsuka, Yousuke Nakai, Hiroyuki Isayama, Masashi Oka, Sumiko Nagoshi
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(10): 3524.     CrossRef
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    Jian Wang, Jin-Long Hu, Si-Yu Sun
    World Journal of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2023; 15(11): 634.     CrossRef
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    Yuki Kawasaki, Susumu Hijioka, Kosuke Maehara, Kiichi Tamada, Takuji Okusaka, Yutaka Saito
    Endoscopy.2022; 54(S 02): E815.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic ultrasound‐guided gastrojejunostomy for malignant afferent loop syndrome with hemorrhage in a patient with recurrent peritoneal dissemination
    Kenjiro Yamamoto, Takayoshi Tsuchiya, Ryosuke Tonozuka, Shuntaro Mukai, Hiroyuki Kojima, Noriyuki Hirakawa, Takao Itoi
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Sciences.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Toshio Fujisawa, Hiroyuki Isayama
    Digestive Endoscopy.2022; 34(7): 1440.     CrossRef
  • 3,997 View
  • 140 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
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Reviews
The Role of Endoscopy in Small Bowel Neuroendocrine Tumors
Ji Yoon Yoon, Nikhil A. Kumta, Michelle Kang Kim
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):818-824.   Published online April 1, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.296
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Small bowel neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) represent approximately one-third of NETs of the gastrointestinal tract, and their incidence is increasing. When determining if endoscopic resection is appropriate, endoscopic ultrasound is used to assess the lesion size and depth of invasion for duodenal NETs. A number of techniques, including endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), band-assisted EMR (band-EMR), endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and over-the-scope clip-assisted endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR), have been studied; however, the best technique for endoscopic resection remains unclear. The vast majority of currently available data are retrospective, and prospective studies with longer follow-up times are required. For jejunal and ileal NETs, endoscopic techniques such as video capsule endoscopy (VCE) and balloon enteroscopy (BE) assist in diagnosis. This includes localization of the primary NET in metastatic disease where initial workup has been negative, and the identification of multifocal disease, which may change management and prognostication.

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    Sara Massironi, Marianna Franchina, Davide Ippolito, Federica Elisei, Olga Falco, Cesare Maino, Fabio Pagni, Alessandra Elvevi, Luca Guerra, Pietro Invernizzi
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    Sai Swarupa Vulasala, Mayur Virarkar, Dheeraj Gopireddy, Rebecca Waters, Ahmad Alkhasawneh, Ziad Awad, Jessica Maxwell, Nisha Ramani, Sindhu Kumar, Nirmal Onteddu, Ajaykumar C. Morani
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    Sarah Dwyer, Shaffer Mok
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    Apostolis Papaefthymiou, Faidon-Marios Laskaratos, Apostolos Koffas, Anastasios Manolakis, Paraskevas Gkolfakis, Sergio Coda, Mikael Sodergren, Noriko Suzuki, Christos Toumpanakis
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    Eren Berber, Onuralp Ergun, Seyma Avci, Gizem Isiktas, Mohammed Osman, Paresh Mahajan
    Journal of Surgical Oncology.2022; 126(7): 1199.     CrossRef
  • Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors
    Conrad J. Fernandes, Galen Leung, Jennifer R. Eads, Bryson W. Katona
    Gastroenterology Clinics of North America.2022; 51(3): 625.     CrossRef
  • 5,785 View
  • 274 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
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Endoscopic Evaluation of Biliary Strictures: Current and Emerging Techniques
Roy Huynh, Corinne Owers, Christopher Pinto, Thuy-My Nguyen, Titus Kwok
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):825-832.   Published online May 27, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.048
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
The diagnosis of biliary strictures in clinical practice can be challenging. Discriminating between benign and malignant biliary strictures is important to prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with incorrect diagnoses. Missing a malignant biliary stricture may delay surgery, resulting in poor prognostic outcomes. Conversely, it has been demonstrated that approximately 20% of patients who undergo surgery for suspected biliary malignancies have a benign etiology on histopathology. Traditional tissue sampling using endoscopic retrograde cholangiography does not always produce a definitive diagnosis, with a considerable proportion of cases remaining as indeterminate biliary strictures. Recent advances in endoscopic techniques have the potential to improve the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of biliary strictures.

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    Meng-Qi Zhuang, Cheng Zheng, Wei-Wei Xie, Lin Xu, Jia-Li Wu, Dao-Quan Zhang, Yuan-Gan Chen, Sen-Sen Niu, Xiang Zhan, Yu-Bao Zhou
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    Diagnostics.2023; 13(20): 3265.     CrossRef
  • Biliary Tree Diagnostics: Advances in Endoscopic Imaging and Tissue Sampling
    Matteo Ghisa, Angelo Bellumat, Manuela De Bona, Flavio Valiante, Marco Tollardo, Gaia Riguccio, Angelo Iacobellis, Edoardo Savarino, Andrea Buda
    Medicina.2022; 58(1): 135.     CrossRef
  • Increasing the Yield: When More Is Better
    Kevin D. Platt, Allison R. Schulman
    American Journal of Gastroenterology.2022; 117(5): 729.     CrossRef
  • 4,447 View
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Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Stent versus Balloon Dilation for the Treatment of Dominant Strictures in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Marina Tucci Gammaro Baldavira Ferreira, Igor Braga Ribeiro, Diogo Turiani Hourneaux de Moura, Thomas R. McCarty, Alberto Machado da Ponte Neto, Galileu Ferreira Ayala Farias, Antônio Afonso de Miranda Neto, Pedro Victor Aniz Gomes de Oliveira, Wanderley Marques Bernardo, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux de Moura
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):833-842.   Published online July 1, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.052
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: The endoscopic management of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC)-associated dominant strictures remains challenging. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare balloon dilation and stent placement in the treatment of dominant strictures among PSC patients.
Methods
Literature searches on MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL and Lilacs/Bireme were performed for studies published until December 2020. Measured outcomes included clinical efficacy, stricture recurrence, cumulative recurrencefree rate, transplant rate, 5-year survival rate, and adverse events (i.e., pancreatitis, cholangitis, bleeding, perforation and death).
Results
A total of 5 studies (n=467) were included. Based on pooled analyses, there were no differences in clinical efficacy (risk difference [RD], -0.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to 0.33; I2=93%) or transplant rates (RD, -0.09; 95% CI, -0.19 to 0.01; I2=0%); however, the risk of occurrence of adverse events was lower with balloon dilatation than with stent placement (RD,-0.34; 95% CI, -0.45 to -0.23; I2=61%). Among the types of adverse events reported, only the rates of cholangitis/bacteremia were significantly lower in balloon dilation patients (RD, -0.19; 95% CI, -0.25 to -0.13; I2=51%).
Conclusions
Compared to balloon dilation, stent placement for dominant strictures in PSC appeared to have higher complication rates without significant differences in efficacy.

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  • Treatment of Non-Anastomotic Biliary Strictures after Liver Transplantation: How Effective Is Our Current Treatment Strategy?
    Florian A. Michael, Mireen Friedrich-Rust, Hans-Peter Erasmus, Christiana Graf, Olivier Ballo, Mate Knabe, Dirk Walter, Christoph D. Steup, Marcus M. Mücke, Victoria T. Mücke, Kai H. Peiffer, Esra Görgülü, Antonia Mondorf, Wolf O. Bechstein, Natalie Filma
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(10): 3491.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis combined with inflammatory bowel disease
    You Sun Kim, Edward H. Hurley, Yoojeong Park, Sungjin Ko
    Intestinal Research.2023; 21(4): 420.     CrossRef
  • Liver Transplantation for Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC) With or Without Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)—A European Society of Organ Transplantation (ESOT) Consensus Statement
    M. Carbone, A. Della Penna, C. Mazzarelli, E. De Martin, C. Villard, A. Bergquist, P. D. Line, J. M. Neuberger, S. Al-Shakhshir, P. J. Trivedi, U. Baumann, L. Cristoferi, J. Hov, B. Fischler, N. H. Hadzic, D. Debray, L. D’Antiga, N. Selzner, L. S. Belli,
    Transplant International.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Primary Biliary Cholangitis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: Current Knowledge of Pathogenesis and Therapeutics
    Ji-Won Park, Jung-Hee Kim, Sung-Eun Kim, Jang Han Jung, Myoung-Kuk Jang, Sang-Hoon Park, Myung-Seok Lee, Hyoung-Su Kim, Ki Tae Suk, Dong Joon Kim
    Biomedicines.2022; 10(6): 1288.     CrossRef
  • Use a biodegradable stent in ERCP and it will never be forgotten
    Jesús García-Cano, Eva de la Santa Belda, Francisco Domper
    Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic stenting of dominant strictures in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis: When, how, and for how long?
    Il Sang Shin, Jong Ho Moon
    Endoscopy International Open.2022; 10(09): E1169.     CrossRef
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Original Articles
A Nationwide Survey on the Facilities and Personnel for Endoscopic Sedation: Results from 50 Qualified Endoscopy Units of Teaching Hospitals Accredited by the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE)
Seon-Young Park, Jun Kyu Lee, Jung-Wook Kim, Tae Hee Lee, Chang-Hwan Park, Jae-Yong Jang, Byung-Wook Kim, Byung Ik Jang, the Quality management and Endoscopic sedation committee of Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE)
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):843-850.   Published online July 14, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.014
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: This study aimed to determine the current status of facilities, equipment, and personnel for endoscopic sedation from endoscopy units of representative hospitals in South Korea.
Methods
A questionnaire survey was conducted on 50 qualified endoscopy units accredited by the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.
Results
All included endoscopy units had regulations and educational programs regarding sedation training for endoscopists and nursing personnel. There present one assisting nurse during endoscopy in 35 units (70%) and at least two nurses in 12 units (24.0%). All endoscopy units had examination rooms equipped with oxygen supply and suction systems. Endoscopist-directed sedation was performed in 48 units (96.0%). Propofol-based sedation was the most used sedation method. All units had a separate recovery bay. The daily number of patients per bed was greater than 10 in 17 units (34.0%). In 26 (52.0%) units, a single nurse cared for ≥10 patients per day. All the units fulfilled the discharge criteria.
Conclusions
This study presents data regarding endoscopic sedation clinical practice in 50 endoscopy units in South Korea. This study presents the current status of endoscopic sedation clinical practice in 50 qualified endoscopy units accredited by the KSGE, which provide excellent quality management.

Citations

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  • Awareness of Endoscopy Nurses About Anesthesia Management in the Pediatric Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit; A Survey Study
    Feyza SEVER, Şamil HIZLI
    Turkish Journal of Pediatric Disease.2023; : 412.     CrossRef
  • Drugs used for sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy
    Jun Kyu Lee
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(11): 735.     CrossRef
  • 3,523 View
  • 116 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
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Risk Factors for Prolonged Hospital Stay after Endoscopy
Toshihiro Nishizawa, Shuntaro Yoshida, Osamu Toyoshima, Tatsuya Matsuno, Masataka Irokawa, Toru Arano, Hirotoshi Ebinuma, Hidekazu Suzuki, Takanori Kanai, Kazuhiko Koike
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):851-856.   Published online March 16, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.292
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: The recovery room used after endoscopy has limited capacity, and an efficient flow of the endoscopy unit is desired. We investigated the duration of hospital stay after endoscopy and the risk factors for prolonged hospital stay among outpatients.
Methods
We retrospectively studied consecutive patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy at the Toyoshima Endoscopy Clinic. We collected data on age, sex, body weight, midazolam and pethidine dosage, respiratory depression during endoscopy, and duration of hospital stay after endoscopy (scope out to check out). Risk factors for prolonged hospital stay (>100 minutes) were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis.
Results
We enrolled 3,898 patients, including 3,517 (90.2%) patients tested under sedation and 381 (9.8%) patients tested without sedation. Overall, 442 (11.3%) patients had prolonged stay (>100 min). The mean time difference between sedation group and non-sedation group was 44.2 minutes for esophagogastroduodenoscopy and 39.1 minutes for colonoscopy. Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.025; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.014−1.036), female sex (OR, 1.657; 95% CI, 1.220−2.249), and midazolam dose (OR, 1.019; 95% CI, 1.013−1.026) were independently associated with prolonged hospital stay after esophagogastroduodenoscopy, with similar results for colonoscopy.
Conclusions
Old age, female sex, and midazolam dose were independent risk factors for prolonged hospital stay after endoscopy.

Citations

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  • Drugs used for sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy
    Jun Kyu Lee
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(11): 735.     CrossRef
  • TXI (Texture and Color Enhancement Imaging) for Serrated Colorectal Lesions
    Toshihiro Nishizawa, Osamu Toyoshima, Shuntaro Yoshida, Chie Uekura, Ken Kurokawa, Munkhbayar Munkhjargal, Miho Obata, Tomoharu Yamada, Mitsuhiro Fujishiro, Hirotoshi Ebinuma, Hidekazu Suzuki
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 11(1): 119.     CrossRef
  • 3,581 View
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Evaluation of Non-invasive Fibrosis Markers in Predicting Esophageal Variceal Bleeding
Sami Cifci, Nergiz Ekmen
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):857-863.   Published online May 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.028
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in liver cirrhosis. In this study, we aimed to predict the possibility of EVB in patients with cirrhosis using a non-invasive score.
Methods
A total of 359 patients with cirrhosis were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of EVB. ChildTurcotte-Pugh (CTP) score, a model for end-stage liver disease, aspartate aminotransferase to alanine aminotransferase ratio, aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI), fibrosis-4-index (FIB-4), aspartate aminotransferase to alanine aminotransferase ratio/platelet ratio index (AARPRI), and S-index were measured for all participants. Receiver operating characteristic curves were obtained for all parameters, and the optimal cut-off value was determined in predicting EVB.
Results
In patients with EVB, the number of platelets (PLT) were low (p<0.001) and APRI, AARPRI, FIB-4, and S-index were significantly higher than those in patients without EBV. APRI, AARPRI, FIB-4, PLT, and S-index were statistically significant predictors of EVB (p<0.05).
Conclusions
FIB-4 and AARPRI, which are non-invasive markers of fibrosis, can be used to predict EVB. In addition, the 66.5 109/L cut-off value for PLT is important for EVB.

Citations

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  • Non-invasive Fibrosis Markers for Predicting Esophageal Varices: A Potential Alternative to Endoscopic Screening
    Kunza Ali, Saad Slah-Ud-Din, Mishal Afzal, Mah R Tariq, Tallha Waheed, Haroon Yousuf
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic accuracy of shear wave elastography versus laboratory parameters as non-invasive screening tool for esophageal varices
    Khaled Mohamed Ali Shehata, Abdul-Allah Ismael Kelany, Salma Mokhtar Osman Hassan, Ramy Mohamed Ahmed, Peter Atef Mounir, Amira Hassan AbdelAziz
    The Egyptian Journal of Internal Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessment of nomogram model for the prediction of esophageal variceal hemorrhage in hepatitis B-induced hepatic cirrhosis
    Jing Xu, Lin Tan, Ning Jiang, Fengcheng Li, Jinling Wang, Beibei Wang, Shasha Li
    European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology.2024; 36(6): 758.     CrossRef
  • Diagnosis of esophageal varices by liver stiffness and serum biomarkers in virus-related compensated advanced chronic liver disease
    Amine Zoughlami, Jordana Serero, Stephen Congly, Irene Zhao, Julie Zhu, Alnoor Ramji, Curtis Cooper, Philip Wong, Robert Bailey, Carla S Coffin, Giada Sebastiani
    Canadian Liver Journal.2023; 6(3): 332.     CrossRef
  • Albumin‑bilirubin grade and INR for the prediction of esophagogastric variceal rebleeding after endoscopic treatment in cirrhosis
    Fenghui Li, Tao Wang, Jing Liang, Baoxin Qian, Fei Tang, Yanying Gao, Jiayu Lv
    Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Biochemical markers to predict the development of gastrointestinal bleeding and esophageal varices after portoenterostomy in biliary atresia
    Wataru Sumida, Takahisa Tainaka, Chiyoe Shirota, Kazuki Yokota, Satoshi Makita, Masamune Okamoto, Aitaro Takimoto, Akihiro Yasui, Shunya Takada, Yoichi Nakagawa, Daiki Kato, Shinya Yokoyama, Yoji Ishizu, Hizuru Amano, Yaohui Guo, Akinari Hinoki, Hiroo Uch
    Pediatric Surgery International.2022; 38(12): 1799.     CrossRef
  • Liver Fibrosis Indices Predict the Severity of SARS-CoV-2 Infection
    Lucilla Crudele, Fabio Novielli, Stefano Petruzzelli, Stefano Battaglia, Antonio Francesco Maria Giuliano, Rosa Melodia, Chiara Maria Morano, Paola Dell’Aquila, Renata Moretti, Luigi Castorani, Roberto Salvia, Gianfranco Inglese, Nicola Susca, Lucrezia de
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(18): 5369.     CrossRef
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The Additive Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma in the Treatment of Actively Bleeding Peptic Ulcer
Waseem M. Seleem, Amr Shaaban Hanafy
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):864-871.   Published online May 25, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.004
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Peptic ulcer bleeding is the most common cause of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) enhances tissue repair, and is therefore used in various medical treatments. A combination of mechanical or electrothermal hemostasis has been recommended for upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding treatment. This study evaluated the additive efficacy of PRP in bleeding peptic ulcer hemostasis and recovery.
Methods
Eighty patients with peptic ulcer bleeding were initially treated by hemoclipping, and were randomly chosen for either additional PRP (n=40) or additional epinephrine (n=40) injections. Both groups were compared with regard to achieving hemostasis and the frequency of complications.
Results
Hemostasis was immediately achieved in both groups. Two patients (5%) in the PRP group and 8 (20%) patients in the epinephrine group experienced rebleeding after 15.9±2.8 and 12.3±3.7 days, respectively. They were managed by PRP injection in addition to proton pump inhibitor infusion. Hemoglobin was substantially increased in the PRP-treated group with full recovery occurring in 60.5% compared to 31.3% of patients in the epinephrine group (p=0.001). There was no recurrent bleeding in the PRP group, but 4/32 (12.5%) patients in the epinephrine group exhibited rebleeding.
Conclusions
PRP showed additional benefit in reducing peptic ulcer bleeding with no reported significant complications. Clinical trial (NCT03733171).

Citations

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  • The impact of submucosal PRP injection on wound healing after endoscopic sinus surgery: a randomized clinical trial
    Konstantina Dinaki, Nikolaos Grigoriadis, Ioannis S. Vizirianakis, Jannis Constantinidis, Stefanos Triaridis, Petros Karkos
    European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology.2024; 281(7): 3587.     CrossRef
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Predictive Factors for Differentiating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors from Leiomyomas Based on Endoscopic Ultrasonography Findings in Patients with Gastric Subepithelial Tumors: A Multicenter Retrospective Study
Sun Moon Kim, Eun Young Kim, Jin Woong Cho, Seong Woo Jeon, Ji Hyun Kim, Tae Hyeon Kim, Jeong Seop Moon, Jin-Oh Kim, the Research Group for Endoscopic Ultrasound of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):872-880.   Published online November 18, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.251
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: The utility of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and leiomyomas of the stomach is not well known. We aimed to evaluate the ability of EUS for differentiating gastric GISTs and leiomyomas.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with histopathologically proven GISTs (n=274) and leiomyomas (n=87). In two consensus meetings, the inter-observer variability in the EUS image analysis was reduced. Using logistic regression analyses, we selected predictive factors and constructed a predictive model and nomogram for differentiating GISTs from leiomyomas. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to measure the discrimination performance in the development and internal validation sets.
Results
Multivariate analysis identified heterogeneity (odds ratio [OR], 9.48), non-cardia (OR, 19.11), and older age (OR, 1.06) as independent predictors of GISTs. The areas under the ROC curve of the predictive model using age, sex, and four EUS factors (homogeneity, location, anechoic spaces, and dimpling or ulcer) were 0.916 (sensitivity, 0.908; specificity, 0.793) and 0.904 (sensitivity, 0.908; specificity, 0.782) in the development and internal validation sets, respectively.
Conclusions
The predictive model and nomogram using age, sex and homogeneity, tumor location, presence of anechoic spaces, and presence of dimpling or ulcer on EUS may facilitate differentiation between GISTs and leiomyomas.

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  • Diagnostic Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) of the Luminal Gastrointestinal Tract
    Giovanna Impellizzeri, Giulio Donato, Claudio De Angelis, Nico Pagano
    Diagnostics.2024; 14(10): 996.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic Ultrasound Advanced Techniques for Diagnosis of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours
    Socrate Pallio, Stefano Francesco Crinò, Marcello Maida, Emanuele Sinagra, Vincenzo Francesco Tripodi, Antonio Facciorusso, Andrew Ofosu, Maria Cristina Conti Bellocchi, Endrit Shahini, Giuseppinella Melita
    Cancers.2023; 15(4): 1285.     CrossRef
  • Results of the interim analysis of a prospective, multicenter, observational study of small subepithelial lesions in the stomach
    Masaya Iwamuro, Toshiharu Mitsuhashi, Tomoki Inaba, Kazuhiro Matsueda, Teruya Nagahara, Yoji Takeuchi, Hisashi Doyama, Masakatsu Mizuno, Tomoyuki Yada, Yoshinari Kawai, Jun Nakamura, Minoru Matsubara, Hiroko Nebiki, Keiko Niimi, Tatsuya Toyokawa, Ryuta Ta
    Digestive Endoscopy.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic ultrasound artificial intelligence-assisted for prediction of gastrointestinal stromal tumors diagnosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Rômulo Sérgio Araújo Gomes, Guilherme Henrique Peixoto de Oliveira, Diogo Turiani Hourneaux de Moura, Ana Paula Samy Tanaka Kotinda, Carolina Ogawa Matsubayashi, Bruno Salomão Hirsch, Matheus Oliveira Veras, João Guilherme Ribeiro Jordão Sasso, Roberto Pa
    World Journal of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2023; 15(8): 528.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence, natural progression, and clinical practices of upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions in Korea: a multicenter study
    Younghee Choe, Yu Kyung Cho, Gwang Ha Kim, Jun-Ho Choi, Eun Soo Kim, Ji Hyun Kim, Eun Kwang Choi, Tae Hyeon Kim, Seong-Hun Kim, Do Hoon Kim
    Clinical Endoscopy.2023; 56(6): 744.     CrossRef
  • Significance of Ultrasound Endoscopy in the Differential Diagnosis of Cardiac Leiomyomas and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors
    燊 苏
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2023; 13(11): 17185.     CrossRef
  • The Diagnosis of Small Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Lesions by Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration and Biopsy
    Masanari Sekine, Takeharu Asano, Hirosato Mashima
    Diagnostics.2022; 12(4): 810.     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound with artificial intelligence for gastrointestinal stromal tumors: A meta‐analysis
    Xiao Hua Ye, Lin Lin Zhao, Lei Wang
    Journal of Digestive Diseases.2022; 23(5-6): 253.     CrossRef
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Comparative Study of Narrow-Band Imaging and i-scan for Predicting the Histology of Intermediate-to-Large Colorectal Polyps: A Prospective, Randomized Pilot Study
Joon Seop Lee, Seong Woo Jeon, Yong Hwan Kwon
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):881-887.   Published online January 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.257
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: To date, no reports have compared the diagnostic efficacy of narrow-band imaging (NBI) and i-scan for the histologic prediction of intermediate-to-large colorectal polyps. We aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of NBI and i-scan in predicting histology, and their inter-/intra-observer agreement.
Methods
We performed a prospective, randomized study that included 66 patients (NBI, n=33 vs. i-scan, n=33) with colorectal polyps (size >10 mm but <50 mm) who underwent colonoscopic resection. During the procedure, three endoscopists documented their prediction using the Japan NBI Expert Team (JNET) classification. Two months after study completion, the endoscopists reviewed still images and video clips for analysis.
Results
The overall diagnostic accuracies in the NBI and i-scan groups were 73.7% (73/99) and 75.8% (75/99), respectively, and there was no statistical significance between the two groups (p=0.744). The JNET classification as applied to NBI and i-scan showed substantial inter-observer agreement (NBI κ-value 0.612, p=0.001 vs. i-scan κ-value 0.662, p=0.002). Additionally, the κ-values of intra-observer agreement were in the range of 0.385–0.660 with NBI and 0.364–0.741 with i-scan.
Conclusions
NBI and i-scan have similar diagnostic accuracies for the histologic prediction of intermediate-to-large colorectal polyps. Furthermore, the inter-/intra-observer agreement was acceptable for both modalities when the JNET classification was applied.

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  • Ultra-minimally invasive endoscopic techniques and colorectal diseases: Current status and its future
    Nalini Kanta Ghosh, Ashok Kumar
    Artificial Intelligence in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Utility of Narrow-Band Imaging International Colorectal Endoscopic Classification in Predicting the Histologies of Diminutive Colorectal Polyps Using I-Scan Optical Enhancement: A Prospective Study
    Yeo Wool Kang, Jong Hoon Lee, Jong Yoon Lee
    Diagnostics.2023; 13(16): 2720.     CrossRef
  • Detecting colorectal lesions with image-enhanced endoscopy: an updated review from clinical trials
    Mizuki Nagai, Sho Suzuki, Yohei Minato, Fumiaki Ishibashi, Kentaro Mochida, Ken Ohata, Tetsuo Morishita
    Clinical Endoscopy.2023; 56(5): 553.     CrossRef
  • Classification and endoscopic diagnosis of colorectal polyps
    Ji Hyun Kim, Sung Chul Park
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2023; 66(11): 633.     CrossRef
  • Usefulness of optical enhancement endoscopy combined with magnification to improve detection of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach
    Sergio Sobrino-Cossío, Oscar Teramoto-Matsubara, Fabian Emura, Raúl Araya, Vítor Arantes, Elymir S. Galvis-García, Marisi Meza-Caballero, Blanca Sinahi García-Aguilar, Arturo Reding-Bernal, Noriya Uedo
    Endoscopy International Open.2022; 10(04): E441.     CrossRef
  • Interventions to improve adenoma detection rates for colonoscopy
    Aasma Shaukat, Anne Tuskey, Vijaya L. Rao, Jason A. Dominitz, M. Hassan Murad, Rajesh N. Keswani, Fateh Bazerbachi, Lukejohn W. Day
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2022; 96(2): 171.     CrossRef
  • A modified fujinon intelligent color enhancement (FICE) in the diagnostics of superficial epithelial neoplasms of the colon
    V. A. Duvanskiy, A. V. Belkov
    Experimental and Clinical Gastroenterology.2022; (5): 154.     CrossRef
  • Mucosal imaging in colon polyps: New advances and what the future may hold
    Edward John Young, Arvinf Rajandran, Hamish Lachlan Philpott, Dharshan Sathananthan, Sophie Fenella Hoile, Rajvinder Singh
    World Journal of Gastroenterology.2022; 28(47): 6632.     CrossRef
  • Commentary on “Comparative Study of Narrow-Band Imaging and i-scan for Predicting the Histology of Intermediate-to-Large Colorectal Polyps: A Prospective, Randomized Pilot Study”
    Yunho Jung, Masayuki Kato
    Clinical Endoscopy.2021; 54(6): 781.     CrossRef
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Endoscopic Interventions for the Early and Remission Phases of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis: What are the More Concrete and Practical Situations for Performing Them?
Sho Hasegawa, Shinsuke Koshita, Yoshihide Kanno, Takahisa Ogawa, Toshitaka Sakai, Hiroaki Kusunose, Kensuke Kubota, Atsushi Nakajima, Yutaka Noda, Kei Ito
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):888-898.   Published online May 27, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.271
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: The use of endoscopic intervention (EI) for acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) remains controversial because the severity of biliary obstruction/cholangitis/pancreatitis is not reflected in the indications for early EI (EEI).
Methods
A total of 148 patients with ABP were included to investigate 1) the differences in the rate of worsening cholangitis/pancreatitis between the EEI group and the early conservative management (ECM) group, especially for each severity of cholangitis/pancreatitis, and 2) the diagnostic ability of imaging studies, including endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), to detect common bile duct stones (CBDSs) in the ECM group.
Results
No differences were observed in the rate of worsening cholangitis between the EEI and ECM groups, regardless of the severity of cholangitis and/or the existence of impacted CBDSs. Among patients without impacted CBDSs and moderate/severe cholangitis, worsening pancreatitis was significantly more frequent in the EEI group (18% vs. 4%, p=0.048). In patients in the ECM group, the sensitivity and specificity for detecting CBDSs were 73% and 98%, respectively, for EUS, whereas the values were 13% and 92%, respectively, for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography.
Conclusions
EEI should be avoided in the absence of moderate/severe cholangitis and/or impacted CBDSs because of the high rate of worsening pancreatitis. EUS can contribute to the accurate detection of residual CBDSs, for the determination of the need for elective EI.
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Endoscopic Transpapillary Gallbladder Drainage for Acute Cholecystitis using Two Gallbladder Stents (Dual Gallbladder Stenting)
Zain A Sobani, Sergio A. Sánchez-Luna, Tarun Rustagi
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):899-902.   Published online May 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.023
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage (ETPGBD) is gaining popularity for the management of acute cholecystitis (AC) in high-risk patients. However, the stents placed during the procedure are not immune to obstruction. Here we describe a novel technique of stenting with two transpapillary stents and evaluate its technical feasibility, safety, and efficacy in AC.
Methods
A retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing ETPGBD using dual stents for AC at our institution between November 1, 2017 and August 31, 2020 was conducted. We abstracted patient data to evaluate technical and clinical success, adverse events, and long-term outcomes. Two stents were placed either during the index procedure or during an interval procedure performed 4–6 weeks after the index procedure.
Results
A total of 21 patients underwent ETPGBD with dual stenting (57.14% male, mean age: 62.14±17.21 years). The median interval between the placement of the first and the second stents was 37 days (range: 0–226 days). Technical and clinical success rates were 100%, with a recurrence rate of 4.76% (n=1) and adverse event rate of 9.52% (n=2) during a mean follow-up period of 471.74±345.64 days (median: 341 days, range: 55–1084 days).
Conclusions
ETPGBD with dual gallbladder stenting is a safe and effective technique for long-term gallbladder drainage in non-surgical candidates. Larger controlled studies are needed to validate our findings for the widespread implementation of this technique.

Citations

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  • Endoscopic Gallbladder Drainage: A Comprehensive Review on Indications, Techniques, and Future Perspectives
    Edoardo Troncone, Rosa Amendola, Alessandro Moscardelli, Elena De Cristofaro, Pasquale De Vico, Omero Alessandro Paoluzi, Giovanni Monteleone, Manuel Perez-Miranda, Giovanna Del Vecchio Blanco
    Medicina.2024; 60(4): 633.     CrossRef
  • Long-Term Impact of Endoscopic Gallbladder Stenting for Calculous Cholecystitis in Poor Surgical Candidates: A Multi-center Comparative Study
    Tadahisa Inoue, Yuta Suzuki, Michihiro Yoshida, Itaru Naitoh, Fumihiro Okumura, Rena Kitano, Kenichi Haneda, Kazuki Hayashi, Masashi Yoneda
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences.2023; 68(4): 1529.     CrossRef
  • Intermediate- to long-term outcomes of endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder stenting in patients with gallstone-related disease: a 10-year single-center experience
    Wiriyaporn Ridtitid, Natee Faknak, Panida Piyachaturawat, Nicha Teeratorn, Yingluk Sritunyarat, Phonthep Angsuwatcharakon, Parit Mekaroonkamol, Pradermchai Kongkam, Rungsun Rerknimitr
    Endoscopy.2023; 55(05): 469.     CrossRef
  • Percutaneous Cystic Duct Interventions and Drain Internalization for Calculous Cholecystitis in Patients Ineligible for Surgery
    Courtney Sperry, Asad Malik, Allison Reiland, Bartley Thornburg, Rajesh Keswani, Muhammed Sufyaan Ebrahim Patel, Aziz Aadam, Anthony Yang, Ezra Teitelbaum, Riad Salem, Ahsun Riaz
    Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology.2023; 34(4): 669.     CrossRef
  • Tips and tricks for endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage
    Jad P. AbiMansour, Ryan J. Law, Andrew C. Storm, Vinay Chandrasekhara
    VideoGIE.2023; 8(11): 474.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of Gallbladder Drainage Methods in the Treatment of Acute Cholecystitis: A Literature Review
    Dorotea Bozic, Zarko Ardalic, Antonio Mestrovic, Josipa Bilandzic Ivisic, Damir Alicic, Ivan Zaja, Tomislav Ivanovic, Ivona Bozic, Zeljko Puljiz, Andre Bratanic
    Medicina.2023; 60(1): 5.     CrossRef
  • Long-Term Outcomes of Endoscopic Gallbladder Drainage for Cholecystitis in Poor Surgical Candidates: An Updated Comprehensive Review
    Tadahisa Inoue, Michihiro Yoshida, Yuta Suzuki, Rena Kitano, Fumihiro Okumura, Itaru Naitoh
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(21): 4842.     CrossRef
  • Transpapillary Gallbladder Drainage for Acute Cholecystitis: Two Stents or Not Two Stents
    Jad AbiMansour, Ryan Law
    Clinical Endoscopy.2021; 54(6): 783.     CrossRef
  • 3,635 View
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Outcomes of Dilation of Recalcitrant Pancreatic Strictures Using a Wire-Guided Cystotome
Sridhar Sundaram, Dhaval Choksi, Aditya Kale, Suprabhat Giri, Biswaranjan Patra, Shobna Bhatia, Akash Shukla
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):903-908.   Published online March 4, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.297
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: Pancreatic strictures in chronic pancreatitis are treated using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with plastic stent placement. The management of recalcitrant strictures remains a challenge, with the use of a Soehendra stent retriever or a needle knife described in case reports. Here, we discuss our experience with dilation of dominant pancreatic strictures with a 6-Fr cystotome.
Methods
A retrospective review of an endoscopy database was performed to search for patients with pancreatic strictures recalcitrant to conventional methods of dilation in which a cystotome was used. Technical success was defined as the successful dilation of the stricture with plastic stent placement. Functional success was defined as substantial pain relief or resolution of pancreatic fistulae.
Results
Ten patients (mean age, 30.8 years) underwent dilation of a dominant pancreatic stricture secondary to chronic pancreatitis, with a 6-Fr cystotome. Seven patients presented with pain. Three patients had pancreatic fistulae (two had pancreatic ascites and one had a pancreaticopleural fistula). The median stricture length was 10 mm (range, 5–25 mm). The head of the pancreas was the most common location of the stricture (60%). Technical and functional success was achieved in all patients. One patient had self-limiting bleeding, whereas another patient developed mild post-ERCP pancreatitis.
Conclusions
The use of a 6-Fr cystotome (diathermy catheter) can be an alternative method for dilation of recalcitrant pancreatic strictures after the failure of conventional modalities.

Citations

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  • Treatment of Difficult Pancreatic Duct Strictures Using a Cystotome: A Single-Center Experience
    Jonghyun Lee, Dong Uk Kim, Sung Yong Han
    The Korean Journal of Pancreas and Biliary Tract.2023; 28(4): 108.     CrossRef
  • Approach to management of pancreatic strictures: the gastroenterologist’s perspective
    Vaneet Jearth, Suprabhat Giri, Sridhar Sundaram
    Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology.2021; 14(6): 1587.     CrossRef
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RWON Study: The Real-World Walled-off Necrosis Study
Ankush Pawar, Ujjwal Sonika, Manish Kumar, Sundeep Saluja, Siddharth Srivastava
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):909-915.   Published online February 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.175
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Background
/Aims: The management of walled-off necrosis (WON) has undergone a paradigm shift from surgical to nonsurgical modalities. Real-world data on the management of symptomatic WON are scarce.
Methods
Prospectively collected data of symptomatic WON cases were retrospectively evaluated. The treatment modalities used were medical management alone, percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) or endoscopic drainage (ED), or a combination of PCD and ED. We compared clinical outcome among these modalities.
Results
A total of 264 patients were evaluated. The most common indications for drainage were pain and fever. Of the patients, 28% was treated with medical therapy alone, 31% with ED, 37% with PCD, and 4% with a combined approach. Technical success and clinical success were achieved in 93% and 91% of patients in the endoscopic arm and in 90% and 81% patients in the PCD arm, respectively (p=0.0004 for clinical success). Lower rates of complications (7% vs. 22%, p=0.005), readmission (20% vs. 34%, p=0.04), and mortality (4% vs. 19%, p=0.0012), and shorter hospital stay (13 days vs. 19 days, p=0.0018) were observed in the endoscopic group than in the PCD group.
Conclusions
ED of WON is better than PCD and is associated with lower mortality, fewer complications, and shorter hospitalization.

Citations

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  • Endoscopic ultrasound drainage of pancreatic fluid collections: do we know enough about the best approach?
    Andrada Seicean, Cristina Pojoga, Voicu Rednic, Claudia Hagiu, Radu Seicean
    Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Treatment of Walled-off Necrosis – Outcomes are Best When Endoscopy and Percutaneous Interventions are Complimentary, Not Exclusive
    Ji Young Bang, Shyam Varadarajulu
    Clinical Endoscopy.2021; 54(6): 785.     CrossRef
  • 3,898 View
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Case Reports
Perforation of a Gastric Tear during Esophageal Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection under General Anesthesia
Tomoaki Yamasaki, Yuhei Sakata, Takehisa Suekane, Hiroko Nebiki
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):916-919.   Published online November 12, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.220
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Mallory-Weiss tears (MWT) are occasionally encountered during endoscopic procedures. Esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is widely performed under general anesthesia to avoid unexpected body movements. We present the case of a 68-year-old woman with squamous cell carcinoma. Although ESD was performed under general anesthesia, a gastric perforation at the MWT caused by gastric inflation was observed after the procedure. The perforation was closed endoscopically, and she was discharged without any sequelae. Although general anesthesia is useful for esophageal ESD, it should be noted that it can cause MWT, and in rare cases, gastric perforation, due to gastric inflation during the procedure.

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  • Gastric Perforation Encountered during Duodenal Stent Insertion
    Sung Woo Ko, Hoonsub So, Sung Jo Bang
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology.2022; 80(5): 221.     CrossRef
  • 3,868 View
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A Rare Case of Coil Migration into the Duodenum after Embolization of a Right Colic Artery Pseudoaneurysm
Jeongmin Choi, Young Moon Kim
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):920-923.   Published online January 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.228
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Transcatheter arterial embolization is a safe and effective treatment for visceral artery aneurysms; nevertheless, some complications can occur. Coil migration to other organs after embolization is extremely rare, and only 16 cases have been reported previously. We report a rare case of coil migration to the duodenal lumen after embolization of a right colic artery pseudoaneurysm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of coil migration after a right colic artery embolization. The patient exhibited no symptoms and was treated conservatively without any intervention. Some previous reports have demonstrated spontaneous coil passage and successful conservative management. Our case supports conservative treatment as the primary treatment for asymptomatic patients. Clinicians should assess the risks and benefits of coil removal in asymptomatic patients before performing any intervention.

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  • Case report: Duodenal obstruction caused by gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm with hematoma: an unusual case and literature review
    Yan-Yuan Zhou, Shao-Chung Wang, Chen-June Seak, Shu-Wei Huang, Hao-Tsai Cheng
    Frontiers in Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessing the aneurysm occlusion efficacy of a shear-thinning biomaterial in a 3D-printed model
    Grant Schroeder, Masoud Edalati, Gregory Tom, Nicole Kuntjoro, Mark Gutin, Melvin Gurian, Edoardo Cuniberto, Elisabeth Hirth, Alessia Martiri, Maria Teresa Sposato, Selda Aminzadeh, James Eichenbaum, Parvin Alizadeh, Avijit Baidya, Reihaneh Haghniaz, Roho
    Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials.2022; 130: 105156.     CrossRef
  • A case of coil migration into the colon after embolization of the spleno-renal shunt
    Tomomi Sadamitsu, Fumikazu Koyama, Toshihiro Tanaka, Hiroyuki Kuge, Masayuki Sho
    Techniques in Coloproctology.2022; 26(11): 923.     CrossRef
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High-Resolution Probe-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for Diagnosing Biliary Diseases
Hiroki Koda, Kazuo Hara, Okuno Nozomi, Takamichi Kuwahara, Mizuno Nobumasa, Shin Haba, Miyano Akira, Isomoto Hajime
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):924-929.   Published online March 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.191
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy is an endoscopic technique that enables in vivo histological evaluation using fluorescent pigment. The ability to diagnostically differentiate between benign and malignant biliary disease using the “CholangioFlexTM”, a dedicated biliary device, has been reported. However, the Miami and Paris classifications, used as diagnostic criteria, mainly evaluate findings in the submucosa, and visualizing the epithelium as the main site of lesions remains difficult. To address this problem, we verified the imaging findings and diagnostic ability of three types of probes: CholangioFlexTM, GastroFlexTM, and AlveoFlexTM. With GastroFlexTM, the clear mucosal epithelium was observed, and differential diagnoses as benign/malignant could be made based on epithelial findings. GastroFlexTM may be a good first-choice probe for probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy of biliary diseases, and a new diagnostic classification based on bile duct epithelial findings may provide useful criteria independent of the Miami or Paris classifications.
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Minimally Invasive Approach Using Digital Single-Operator Peroral Cholangioscopy-Guided Electrohydraulic Lithotripsy and Endoscopic Nasogallbladder Drainage for the Management of High-Grade Mirizzi Syndrome
Hyung Ku Chon, Chan Park, Tae Hyeon Kim
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):930-934.   Published online February 18, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.015
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReaderePub
Mirizzi syndrome is a rare complication of gallbladder disease that can be difficult to treat. In particular, endoscopic treatment often fails because of the inability to access or to capture the impacted cystic duct stone. We report a case of Mirizzi syndrome grade III that was successfully managed by digital single-operator peroral cholangioscopy-guided electrohydraulic lithotripsy with endoscopic nasogallbladder drainage and interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Based on our experience, digital single-operator peroral cholangioscopy-guided electrohydraulic lithotripsy with endoscopic nasogallbladder drainage is a feasible minimally invasive approach for the management of high-grade Mirizzi syndrome.

Citations

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  • Difficult Biliary Stones: A Comprehensive Review of New and Old Lithotripsy Techniques
    Edoardo Troncone, Michelangela Mossa, Pasquale De Vico, Giovanni Monteleone, Giovanna Del Vecchio Blanco
    Medicina.2022; 58(1): 120.     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic management of cystic duct stones and Mirizzi’s syndrome: experience at an academic medical center
    Rishi Pawa, Robert Dorrell, Swati Pawa
    Endoscopy International Open.2022; 10(01): E135.     CrossRef
  • Mirizzi Syndrome Type IV Successfully Treated with Peroral Single-operator Cholangioscopy-guided Electrohydraulic Lithotripsy: A Case Report with Literature Review
    Hirokazu Kawai, Toshifumi Sato, Masaaki Natsui, Kotaro Watanabe, Ryosuke Inoue, Mayuki Kimura, Kazumi Yoko, Syun-ya Sasaki, Masashi Watanabe, Taku Ohashi, Akihiro Tsukahara, Norio Tanaka, Yoshihisa Tsukada
    Internal Medicine.2022; 61(23): 3513.     CrossRef
  • Quality of life of treated patients with Mirizi syndrome
    F. M. Pavuk
    Klinicheskaia khirurgiia.2021; 88(1-2): 69.     CrossRef
  • A Stone in Remnant Cystic Duct Causing Mirizzi Syndrome Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
    Min Jae Yang, Do Hyun Park
    Clinical Endoscopy.2021; 54(5): 777.     CrossRef
  • 3,284 View
  • 94 Download
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Brief Reports
Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection of an Inverted Pyloric Gland Adenoma Using Dental Floss and Clip Traction
Gwang Ha Kim, Moon Won Lee, Bong Eun Lee, Do Youn Park
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):935-936.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2020.164
PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReaderePub

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  • Synchronous gastric MALT lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma of fundic gland type arising from a hamartomatous inverted polyp in a Helicobacter pylori naive patient
    Ryo Miyamoto, Hidehiko Takigawa, Takahiro Kotachi, Hiroki Kadota, Ryo Yuge, Ryohei Hayashi, Yuji Urabe, Akira Ishikawa, Kazuhiro Sentani, Shiro Oka
    Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology.2023; 16(4): 521.     CrossRef
  • The Many Faces of Gastric Inverted Polyps: a case report
    S.I. Kim, M.Y. Agapov, T.F. Savostyanov, A.A. Paratovskaya, I.A. Sokolova
    Dokazatel'naya gastroenterologiya.2023; 12(2): 88.     CrossRef
  • Pyloric Gastric Adenoma: Endoscopic Detection, Removal, and Echoendosonographic Characterization
    Anabel Liyen Cartelle, Erik A. Holzwanger, Samuel Igbinedion, Sultan Mahmood, Harry J. Rosenberg, Tyler M. Berzin, Mandeep S. Sawhney, Moamen Gabr, Douglas K. Pleskow
    ACG Case Reports Journal.2023; 10(12): e01229.     CrossRef
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  • 161 Download
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Hematochezia in Patient with Rectal Tumor: Consideration of Various Diagnostic Possibilities
Hae Min Jeong, Chang Seok Bang, Gwang Ho Baik
Clin Endosc 2021;54(6):939-941.   Published online November 2, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5946/ce.2021.243
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