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HOME > Clin Endosc > Volume 15(4); 1995 > Article
[Epub ahead of print]
DOI: https://doi.org/
Published online: November 30, 1994
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Bleeding from gastric varices greater than 2cm in diameter represents a major limitation for endoscopic hemostasis. The endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) using conventional sclerosing agents is not satisfactory for the control of acute bleeding from gastric varices which have large diameter, fast blood flow and abundant collateral circulations. Endoscopic ligation using small rubber bands, known to be alternative to EIS, never obliterate large gastric varices greater than 2 cm in diameter. Obliteration therapy using Histoacryl (n-buty1-2-cyanoacrylate), known to be more satisfactory, has some drawback such as embolization. We per formed endoscopic ligation using detachable snares and rubber bands in 22 patients who had recently bleeding from gastric varices larger than 2 cm in diameter. For ligation of gastric varices larger than 2 cm in diameter, the detachable snares were used, and then for ligation of adjacent small gastric varices, rubber bands were used. In seven patients active bleedings were noted at initial endoscopy; 6 of them were successfully controlled by endoscopic ligation using detachable snares and rubber bands, but one patient who was uncontrolled by it died from bleeding and multiple organ failure. In remaining 15 patients, there were no active bleeding but red color signs on large gastric varices; all of them were successfully controlled by endoscopic ligation using detachable snares and rubber bands. Early rebleeding, fol lowing initial treatment, occurred in two patients (9.5%). So overall hemostatic rate of endoscopic ligation using the detachable snares and the rubber bands was 86.4% (19/22). Varices were nearly eradicated in 18 (85.7%) of the 21 survivors by ligation of 1-3 detachable snares (mean, l.3 snares) and 4-30 rubber bands (mean, 16,2 bands) in 2-6 sessions (mean, 3.2 sessions). During or after ligation, there were no serious complications, except transient epigastric pain or discomfort in 14.7% and fever in 1.3%. These results suggest that endoscopic ligation therapy with detachable snares and rubber bands is a safe and effective method for treatment of acute bleeding of gastric varices, especially gastric varices larger than 2 cm in diameter, which can not he controlled by conventional scleratherapy or variceal band ligation. (Kor J Gastrolntest Endosc 15: 670-677, 1995)


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